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asian american

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David Louie, one of the Bay Area’s first Asian American TV reporters, retires after 50 years

david louie
  • Asian American TV reporter David Louie has retired after 50 years of working at ABC7 in San Francisco.
  • He was one of the first Asian American journalists to be hired by a TV news outlet in the Bay Area, and has been on air the longest.
  • Over the years, Louie took on many of the Bay Area’s biggest stories, including the Loma Prieta earthquake, the kidnapping of Patty Hearst, the 9/11 attack in Washington, DC, and the 1976 Chowchilla Kidnapping.
  • ABC7 news anchors Kristen Sze and Dan Ashley recalled Louie’s kindness and impact throughout the years in an on-air tribute.

Asian American TV reporter David Louie has marked the end of his 50-year career at ABC7 in San Francisco.

Louie, who became a trailblazer for Asian American journalists, celebrated his retirement at the Ferry Plaza’s Wine Merchant with his colleagues on Wednesday. 

Poll: Asian Americans don’t feel safe in San Francisco; only 14% predict improvement

  • According to a poll conducted by the San Francisco Chronicle, Asian American residents in San Francisco feel the least safe out of any other groups.
  • Only 14% of the 490 Asian respondents believe that living in San Francisco will be better in the next two years, the lowest rate among all ethnic groups.
  • Meanwhile, 44% of Asian Americans think that living in the city will even be worse in two years, which exceeds the 35% overall who similarly think so.
  • Asian Americans, who make up over a third of the population in the city, mostly cited safety/crime as San Francisco’s biggest issue.
  • While they acknowledged the crime problem in the city, Asian respondents were found to be the least likely to report being victimized by a crime.

Asian American residents in San Francisco feel less safe than other groups, according to a recent poll by the San Francisco Chronicle. 

As part of its SFNext project, the paper conducted a survey of 1,653 local residents belonging to different racial groups and released its findings on Sept. 14. 

Boston Globe under fire for using slain Asians’ image in op-ed on whether Asians benefit from ‘whiteness’

  • The Boston Globe has come under fire for using an image that features Asian victims of violence in an op-ed that questions whether Asians are victims of racism or beneficiaries of white privilege.
  • The newspaper originally published a cover image of anti-affirmative action protesters, but the author of the article, Natasha Warikoo, asked to have it changed.
  • It’s unclear who exactly chose the replacement, which now shows illustrated portraits of the late Michelle Go, Vicha Ratanapakdee and other Asian victims of violence.
  • Designer Jonathan D. Chang, who illustrated the portraits, was among those who criticized the cover choice, writing “What the f*ck?”
  • Others took offense directly to Warikoo’s writing, with one accusing her of being racist herself.

The Boston Globe has come under fire for using an image that features Asian victims of violence — with the late Michelle Go at the center — in an opinion piece that questions whether Asians are victims of racism or beneficiaries of white privilege.

The newspaper originally published a cover image of anti-affirmative action protesters to go with the story. However, the author of the article, Natasha Warikoo, asked to have it replaced because it was “precisely the kind of simplistic thinking I was arguing against.”

‘He’s the kind of person who leads by example’: General Electric researcher HP Wang dies at 75

  • General Electric researcher Dr. Hsin-Pang Wang died from colon cancer on Sept. 6. He was 75.
  • “He was really like a father and uncle to a lot of people,” Jennifer Zhao, executive director of the International Center of the Capital Region, told the Times Union. “He’s the kind of person who leads by example.”
  • Born in Nanjing, China, in 1946, Wang and his family moved to Taiwan in 1949. He studied at National Cheng Kung University before moving to the United States to study mechanical engineering at the University of Florida in 1970.
  • He met his partner, Ting-Ting, at the University of Florida and got married in 1973. The couple then relocated to Albany, New York, in 1976, the same year Wang started his 34-year career at General Electric Global Research.
  • During those years, Wang reportedly held more than 100 patents and invented several technologies, including a breakthrough invention that improves gas turbine efficiency for power generation and helps to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions.
  • In 1997, Wang founded General Electric’s Asian Pacific American Forum (APAF). He also served as the president of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Albany-Mohawk Chapter and the president of the 80-20 Educational Foundation’s Board of Donors.

General Electric researcher Dr. Hsin-Pang Wang, described by many of his colleagues as an altruistic leader and visionary, has died at 75.

Wang, also known as HP Wang, died on Sept. 6 from colon cancer, according to his obituary.

Oldest Asian America beauty pageant crowns Lisa Yan, Angella Lee as winners

  • Lisa Yan and Angella Lee have been named the winners of the 37th Miss Asian Global and Miss Asian America Pageant.
  • Yan grew up in Palo Alto, California, and has been working as a software engineer at Waymo, a company closely connected to Google that improves safety and accessibility for self-driving cars.
  • Lee was born and raised in Southern California and moved to San Francisco after graduating from nursing school. She later found her calling in aesthetic medicine and has been working in Beverly Hills as a nurse injector.
  • Founded in 1985, the Miss Asian Global and Miss Asian America Pageant is “committed to the personal and professional growth of young Asian women” and aims to “empower them to break into leadership," its official website states.

The United States’ oldest Asian American beauty pageant has crowned Lisa Yan as this year’s Miss Asian Global and Angella Lee as Miss Asian America 2022.

During an interview with KRON4’s Stephanie Lin, who was announced Miss Asian America in 2015, Yan said she competed in this year’s Miss Asian Global and Miss Asian America Pageant without any expectations. She also admitted that she was shocked when her name was announced.

Rhode Island becomes fourth state to require schools to teach AAPI history

  • Effective at the start of the 2023-2024 school year, all public elementary and secondary schools in Rhode Island will be required to teach Asian American history and culture to students, based on the new bill that Governor Dan McKee signed into law on Saturday.
  • Rhode Island is now the fourth state in the U.S, following New Jersey, Connecticut and Illinois, to require Asian-American studies in its public school curriculum.
  • McKee signed the piece of legislation during the opening ceremonies of the Rhode Island Chinese Dragon Boat Races and Taiwan Day Festival in the city of Pawtucket.
  • “Rhode Island’s strength is in its diversity and this important legislation will do so much to highlight the rich history and heritage of the Asian American community and the positive impact they’ve had on our state and country,”  the governor said during the event.
  • State Representative Barbara Ann Fenton-Fung (R, RI-15), who sponsored the bill in the House, said: “Combined with the rising bias against Asian Americans, there is a clear need to break this cycle of cultural misunderstandings and this legislation is a good first step in that direction.”

Schools in the state of Rhode Island will now be required to teach Asian American history and culture to students.

According to a new bill signed into law by Governor Dan McKee on Saturday, which is set to take effect at the beginning of the 2023-2024 school year, all public elementary and secondary schools in the state will be required to each teach at least one unit on Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander history and culture. 

Asian American attorney says she was passed up for promotions because of her race in federal lawsuit

An Asian American attorney based in Darien, Connecticut, has launched a federal lawsuit against her former employer for allegedly discriminating against her due to her race and sex.

Michelle Lee, who worked at Darien-based Portfolio Advisors for about 15 years, claims she received “racialized comments” and “repeated sexual remarks and advances” from colleagues at the firm. Supervisors who knew some of such incidents allegedly failed to provide a remedy.

Turning anger into activism: What we learned from the stories told at this year’s Asian film festival

While spikes in hate crimes and violence against Asian Americans have emboldened activism in recent years, filmmakers and creatives have long been working to amplify Asian stories for decades.

In 1978, a group of grassroots activists organized the very first iteration of the Asian American International Film Festival (AAIFF), the oldest and longest-running cinematic showcase of its kind. Throughout the years, the festival has debuted some of the most acclaimed directors of Asian descent, from Wayne Wang to Ang Lee, and showcased films from over 40 countries.

Asian American advocacy groups oppose nomination of US attorney candidate in Tennessee

groups opposes nominee
  • Casey Arrowood, an assistant U.S. Attorney, is one of Biden’s nominees to serve as the U.S. Attorney in the Eastern District of Tennessee.
  • Asian American advocacy groups are calling on the Senate Judiciary Committee and the Biden administration to reject the nomination of Arrowood following his role in the wrongful prosecution of a University of Tennessee professor.
  • Arrowood was the lead prosecutor of professor Anming Hu, an internationally renowned nanotechnology expert who was targeted by the FBI under the Trump administration’s “China Initiative.”
  • Hu was the first person to be prosecuted and tried in a wire fraud case before he was acquitted of all charges after the government’s evidence was deemed insufficient.

Asian American advocacy groups have opposed President Joe Biden’s nomination of Casey Arrowood to serve as U.S. Attorney.

Arrowood, an assistant U.S. Attorney, is one of Biden’s nominees to serve as the U.S. Attorney in the Eastern District of Tennessee. On July 29, the president announced his candidacy to hold the top position in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Knoxville.

AAPIs mark the largest increase among new immigrants in state legislatures since 2020, report finds

  • There are 27 newly-elected Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) in the 2022 legislative session, the largest gain among groups of first and second-generation U.S. immigrants since 2020.
  • The finding comes in a new report by New American Leaders, a nonpartisan nonprofit that empowers “New Americans” — which it defines as first and second-generation U.S. immigrants — to run for public office.
  • Speaking to NextShark, New American Leaders President Ghida Dagher attributed the AAPI community’s heightened political participation to the need to combat anti-Asian hate, which has progressively worsened amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Dagher said New Americans get involved in politics for the same reason any other American does: to see change in the policies affecting their communities.

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) saw the largest gains among first- and second-generation U.S. immigrants in state legislatures in 2022, a new report has found. 

Twenty-seven first- and second-generation AAPIs were newly elected to this year’s legislative session, bringing the total of AAPI lawmakers to 103. The group now composes 34.7% of the new immigrant-held legislative seats across the U.S.

SF DA Jenkins to Asian Americans at town hall: ‘You are now seen and heard’

  • San Francisco District Attorney Brooke Jenkins addressed a crowd on Tuesday night to discuss the recent attacks on older Asian Americans. 
  • “I come to you as a sign of change,” Jenkins was quoted as saying. “You’ve been struggling with feeling unheard and unseen... by the San Francisco D.A.’s Office. You are now seen, and you are now heard.”
  • Jenkins, who was appointed to the position just over a month ago, is running for re-election in November.
  • During her speech, Jenkins earned applause while pausing periodically to allow a translator to convey her message to those who do not speak English.
  • According to Jenkins, she would send a message that “this type of conduct is no longer tolerated in San Francisco” by holding people accountable for crimes against Asian American residents.
  • Police Chief Bill Scott acknowledged that attacks against Asian Americans in the city had been going on for over two-and-a-half years.

San Francisco District Attorney Brooke Jenkins earned several rounds of applause as she spoke out against the recent attacks on older Asian Americans during a town hall on Tuesday.

The town hall was organized so that concerned residents could speak and air their grievances directly to local officials in the wake of the latest wave of violence in San Francisco’s Chinatown.

Airbnb hosts with ‘distinctively Asian names’ received fewer bookings during pandemic years, study shows

  • The rise of anti-Asian hate amid the spread of COVID-19 in 2020 resulted in fewer bookings for Asian American hosts on Airbnb, a Harvard study published on Aug. 3 suggested.
  • The study, titled “Scapegoating and Discrimination in Times of Crisis: Evidence from Airbnb,” was based on New York City data sourced from the website Inside Airbnb.
  • Researchers found that Airbnb hosts with “distinctively Asian names” encountered a 12 percent decrease in guests compared to hosts with “White-sounding names” after January 2020.
  • The study posits that the ability to view the names and profile photos of hosts on the online house-sharing platform made it “easier for users to discriminate.” 
  • In response to the new study, Airbnb stated that “measuring race based on name does not paint a full or accurate picture. Many hosts who would identify as Asian may not have ‘distinctively Asian names’ and therefore would not be included in the analysis.” 

The rise of anti-Asian hate amid the spread of COVID-19 in 2020 has resulted in fewer bookings for Asian American hosts on Airbnb, as suggested by a recent study. 

The new Harvard University study, titled “Scapegoating and Discrimination in Times of Crisis: Evidence from Airbnb,” revealed that Asian American hosts on the online home-sharing platform received fewer bookings than hosts of other ethnic backgrounds in the year anti-Asian sentiment was on the rise.