Browsing Tag

asian american

74 posts

Asian American families face food shortage over fears of violence upon going out, Census suggests

Asian American families

Thirty-seven percent of Asian American households that reported not having enough to eat amid the COVID-19 pandemic said it was because they were “afraid” or “did not want” to go out to buy food, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Key details: The figure comes from the agency’s Household Pulse Survey (HPS), which studies how the coronavirus is impacting U.S. households from a social and economic perspective.

McDonald’s APA Next program features mental health services for students, advice from AAPI figures

mcdonalds

McDonald’s launched an initiative that will help Asian American students reach their educational goals and provide personal stories from AAPI figures such as actress Ally Maki, activist Amanda Nguyen and Teen Vogue editor-in-chief Versha Sharma.

The initiative: The program, titled “APA Next,”  was designed to “empower and uplift students through their academic journey by providing tools and resources to help them succeed,” according to The College Post.

Illinois Senate Unanimously Passes Bill Requiring Schools to Teach Asian American History

Asian American history

Illinois is now on its way to becoming the first state to require public schools to teach Asian American history as part of its curriculum as the Teaching Equitable Asian American Community History (TEAACH) Act enters final voting.

The final phase: The TEAACH Act (HB 376) received a unanimous vote of 57-0 at the Illinois Senate on Tuesday, according to Injustice Watch.

Gold House Unveils A100 List, Socioeconomic Ventures in Time for AAPI Heritage Month

Gold House

Gold House has announced multiple ventures toward representation, economic investment and individual empowerment in time for the Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.

The nonprofit, a premier collective of Asian and Pacific Islander (API) cultural leaders, was founded in 2018 to unify the community and enable “more authentic multicultural representation and societal equity.”

10 Years After Starring in ‘Gran Torino’, I See Today’s Anti-Asian Racism for What it Really Is

Back in 2008, I starred opposite Clint Eastwood in “Gran Torino” playing the lead Hmong role in a tale of two people transcending their differences to form an unlikely human bond. It was a historic cinematic moment for Hmong people around the world, despite its copious anti-Asian slurs.

At the time, there was a lot of discussion about whether the movie’s slurs were insensitive and gratuitous or simply “harmless jokes.” I found it unnerving, the laughter that the slurs elicited in theaters with predominantly white audiences. And it was always white people who would say, “Can’t you take a joke?”

On Anti-Asian Hate Crimes: Who Is Our Real Enemy?

Hate crimes

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published on Medium and reposted with permission.

In recent weeks, there have been over 20 attacks on Asian businesses and people, mostly elders, with little to no coverage from the mainstream news outlets. Videos documenting such attacks have been circulating, mostly through individual social media accounts of Asian activists, celebrities, and journalists (thank you Amanda Nguyen, Dion Lim, Dr. Kiona, Daniel Dae Kim, Benny Luo, Lisa Ling, and Daniel Wu for being among the first public figures to use your platform to mobilize others). They show a 91-year-old Chinese man being shoved to the ground in Oakland’s Chinatown on Sunday, January 31st, just two days before an 84-year-old Thai man, Vicha Ratanapakdee, was pushed and killed in San Francisco, and multiple accounts of robberies targeting Asian-owned businesses in Chinatowns. In New York, a 61-year-old Filipino man was slashed across the face from ear to ear on Feb 3rd, and on the same day, a 70-year-old Asian woman was assaulted and robbed in Oakland.

Google to Pay $2.5 Million for Alleged Discrimination, Back Pay and Overlooked Asian Applicants

Google

Google has agreed to pay a total of $3.8 million after the U.S. Department of Labor investigated allegations that the company underpaid female software engineers and overlooked female and Asian applicants for engineering positions.

In a settlement, the company says it will pay $1,353,052 in back pay and interest to 2,565 female engineers. It will also pay $1,232,000 in back pay and interest to 1,757 female engineering applicants and 1,219 Asian engineering applicants for “engineering positions not hired,” according to The Verge.