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ucla

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Asian American Studies Center to create free digital resource on AAPI experiences for teachers

UCLA digital lessons
  • The UCLA Asian American Studies Center will use the $10 million in state funding it received from California to develop the AAPI Multimedia Textbook, an online platform containing lessons about the cultures, histories and contributions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States.
  • The multimedia textbook will contain flexible modules for teachers, with learning activities and lesson plans geared towards high school and college students.
  • The platform’s content will be developed by scholars from across the country, curated by members of AAPI communities and evaluated by the center.
  • According to Karen Umemoto, the Helen and Morgan Chu Endowed Director's Chair of the Asian American Studies Center, the resource will be “the most comprehensive, scholar-informed, online history of AAPIs that redefines the American narrative and opens unlimited possibilities for building a just, multiracial and democratic future.”

The UCLA Asian American Studies Center is developing a free digital resource for teachers to aid them in teaching about the experiences of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

The center will use the $10 million in state funding it received from California to develop the AAPI Multimedia Textbook, an online platform containing lessons about the cultures, histories and contributions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States.

Low-income Asian Americans received the lowest rental aid amid COVID-19, study finds

  • A University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) study examined the demographics of more than 534,000 California renters who applied to California's Emergency Rental Assistance Program between March 2021 and March 2022.
  • While 48% of distressed white renters and 64% of Black distressed renters applied for relief, only 25% of distressed Asian American renters did.
  • The study underscores the likelihood of unmeasured accessibility barriers such as limited English proficiency and immigration status, which could lead to lower applications among Asian Americans.

A new University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) study on housing insecurity in California during the COVID-19 pandemic reveals that Asian Americans applied the least and received the lowest amount of rental assistance across all racial groups.

The study, titled “Housing Insecurity Persists for Renters of Color Amid the Covid-19 Pandemic,” examined the demographics of more than 534,000 California renters who applied for the state’s Emergency Rental Assistance Program between March 2021 and March 2022, using the U.S. Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey data.

Survey: 2 in 3 AAPI in Los Angeles County worry about being victimized by racial attack

asian hate
  • A recent survey conducted by The Pat Brown Institute highlights the fears and concerns of AAPI communities in Los Angeles County.
  • Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed reported worrying about hate crimes, and a quarter reported being the victim of a hate crime during the pandemic.
  • Half of the respondents reported having experienced racial discrimination in their everyday life.
  • A majority surveyed thought police funding should either remain the same or increase.

A recent survey conducted by The Pat Brown Institute for Public Affairs at California State University Los Angeles found that two-thirds of Asian Americans were afraid of racial attacks, among other key takeaways.

The survey collected responses from 1500 AAPI residents throughout Los Angeles County between Nov. 8 and Dec. 24 of last year. Residents were polled either online or by phone. According to the census bureau, LA County had about 1,582,213 AAPI-identifying residents as of 2020. 

UCLA community put on alert over white supremacist rally flyer that praised Atlanta spa shooter

UCLA white supremacist rally
  • A flyer stating a white supremacist rally would be held on the University of California, Los Angeles campus on Feb. 14 caused concern among community members.
  • The flyer, sent to the Asian American Studies Center via mail on Feb. 9, reportedly contained xenophobic remarks and slurs targeting Asian American, Black and LGBTQ plus communities.
  • It also included a picture and praise of Robert Aaron Long, the 21-year-old man who killed eight people, including six Asian women, during the Atlanta spa shootings in March 2021.
  • “We have investigated this incident and do not see a need to modify campus plans at this time. At the same time, additional Community Program/Security Officers and UCPD officers will be monitoring campus tomorrow out of an abundance of caution,” Chancellor Gene Block said in a letter on Feb. 13.
  • The campus reportedly hired security company Professional Security Consultants while the UCLA Police Department (UCPD) deployed officers to Murphy Hall and Campbell Hall in anticipation.
  • Asian American studies department chair Natalie Masuoka, vice-chair Keith Camacho and UCLA spokesperson Bill Kisliuk all confirmed no white supremacist rally took place on campus on Feb. 14.

University of California, Los Angeles community members were put on high alert after the Asian American Studies Center (AASC) received a letter saying a white supremacist rally would be held on campus on Feb. 14.

The flyer, sent to AASC through mail on Feb. 9, reportedly contained xenophobic remarks, slurs and derogatory terms targeting the Asian American, Black and LGBTQ plus communities, the Daily Bruin reported.

LA Community Bands Together to Save Beloved Asian-Owned Cafe Visited by Tony Hawk, Dave Grohl

VIP's Cafe

Community members of Tarzana, Los Angeles have chipped in to help the struggling VIP’s Cafe, the favorite cafe of the late legendary UCLA coach John Wooden, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The mom and pop cafe, owned by Paul and Lucy Ma, is struggling to pay their staff and rent since it reopened on May 11 after shutting their doors in March due to the COVID-19 lockdown orders, LA Weekly reported.

UCLA Professor Sparks Outrage After ‘Wondering’ If His Chinese Students Could Spread Coronavirus

UCLA

A professor from the UCLA School of Law has been accused of racism and xenophobia after posting a series of tweets that ruminated on Chinese people’s supposed consumption of “wild animals” and the possibility that one of his Chinese students could be harboring the coronavirus.

The controversy involving Stephen Bainbridge, who teaches corporate law, reportedly started on Feb. 25, when he mused whether China would ban eating animals that serve as viral hosts if asked “nicely.”

Vietnamese UCLA Professor Gives Students Stuffed Animals Every Week to Show He Cares

vietnamese professor

A Vietnamese professor at UCLA has been getting massive love on social media after one of his students “exposed” his unique teaching routine online. 

Quyen Di Chuc Bui, who leads the Vietnamese language program at the university, regularly lets his students know that he loves them by giving them stuffed animals every week. Whenever he sends each one of them an email, he never forgets to tell them how much he cares at the end, the Daily Bruin reports. 

Chinese Mom Pays $400,000 to Get Son Into UCLA as a Fake Soccer Player

ucla

A Chinese mother from Surrey, British Columbia, Canada was arrested for bribery to get her son into the University of California, Los Angeles as a fake soccer player.

According to the indictment unsealed by the federal court in Boston on Tuesday, 48-year-old mother Xiaoning Sui was arrested in Spain and has been charged with “one count of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.”

UCLA Professor Faces 219 Years in Jail for Sending Military-Grade Technology to China

A Chinese American electrical engineer is facing more than two centuries behind bars for illegally shipping military-grade semiconductors to Chengdu, Sichuan province in southwest China.

On June 26, Shih Yi-chi, 64, a naturalized U.S. citizen, was found guilty of conspiracy to violate the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA), a federal law that prohibits unauthorized exports.

Inside the UCLA Cheating Ring That Helped Chinese Students Scam Their Way to Better Grades

Around the time William Singer’s college admissions controversy was becoming a hot topic back in March, another lesser known scandal involving a Chinese cheating ring was also being dismantled at the UCLA.

It was even on the exact same day, March 12, when the bribery scandal first made headlines, after the FBI reportedly arrested six people involved in a scheme that helped Chinese nationals cheat on English proficiency tests to acquire U.S. student visas.