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studio ghibli

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Studio Ghibli releases new look at highly anticipated Ghibli theme park in Japan

Ghibli Park
  • Studio Ghibli released a short video of Ghibli Park in Japan, which is inspired by the beloved films of Hayao Miyazaki and his animation studio.
  • The video showcases some of the theme park’s attractions, including replicas of the Earth Shop from “Whisper of the Heart” and Satsuki and Mei’s house from “My Neighbor Totoro.”
  • Starting on Nov. 1, fans can take a stroll around the theme park’s first attractions, including the Grand Warehouse, the Hill of Youth and Dondoko Forest.

Studio Ghibli has recently released a short video of Ghibli Park, showcasing some of the theme park’s attractions in Japan’s Aichi prefecture.

Ghibli Park, which is located at Aichi Expo Memorial Park in Nagakute, Aichi, is inspired by the beloved films of Hayao Miyazaki and his animation studio.

Amigurumi artist’s human-sized Totoro plushie delights Studio Ghibli fans — learn how to make your own

Totoro Plushie
  • Amigurumi artist Julia Tachibana unveiled in July her human-sized amigurumi (crochet plushie) Totoro, the adorable character from the animated film “My Neighbor Totoro.”
  • She announced the completion of her Totoro in style with a photoshoot complete with a fake magazine cover, which she shared on her Instagram account @tachoflove.
  • Tachibana tells NextShark that she completed the project in a couple of weeks and spent nearly $350 in total for the materials, which she admits was “absolutely bonkers.”
  • She also reveals that her Totoro would not have been possible without the help and guidance of fellow creator Petr Medek from the Czech Republic.
  • When asked about her future plans, Tachibana says: “I’d love to design a pop-up museum/event in the future where people can come in and pose with different giant amigurumi creations. I’d love to promote Japanese culture through it and just continue to spread joy! There is something so wonderful about seeing recognizable items in squishy, life-size form!”

A crochet plushie creator delighted Studio Ghibli fans when she finally unveiled her giant crochet Totoro, the adorable character from the 1988 animated film “My Neighbor Totoro.”

For weeks, Julia Tachibana had been updating her followers with the progress of her human-sized Totoro made in the style of amigurumi, the Japanese art of crocheting stuffed creatures. 

This newly revealed Studio Ghibli fact is both mind-blowing and depressing

My neighbor totoro
  • Studio Ghibli revealed some surprising secrets behind their 1988 film “My Neighbor Totoro” during last week’s screening on Nippon TV’s “Kino Roadshow.”
  • Ghibli movies are broadcast every Friday night during the summer months as part of the station’s programming, and the animation studio takes the time to divulge secrets behind them on Twitter.

Studio Ghibli recently revealed some surprising secrets behind their 1988 film “My Neighbor Totoro.” 

Details emerged last week during Nippon TV’s “Kinyo Roadshow,” where Studio Ghibli movies are aired every Friday night during the summer months. The screenings have become more of a mixed-media event over the years, with the animation studio divulging information about the movie via their Twitter account as it is being aired and allowing fans to answer trivia questions. 

The voice behind Moro in ‘Princess Mononoke’ is an absolute legend

  • A behind-the-scenes clip from the production of Studio Ghibli’s 1997 film “Princess Mononoke” has gone viral on Twitter.
  • In the clip, Akihiro Miwa, the voice of Moro, goes through the process of finding the perfect tone for the wolf god’s mocking laugh.
  • The film’s director, Hayao Miyazaki, asks for a laugh with “a strong impression.”
  • Miwa’s third attempt blows Miyazaki away, causing him to sit up straight in his chair with excitement.
  • Miwa is an accomplished Japanese drag queen, actor and singer, whose acting credits also includes Arechi no Majo, or the Witch of the Waste, in “Howl’s Moving Castle,” another Studio Ghibli production.

A behind-the-scenes clip of recording sessions from the production of Studio Ghibli’s 1997 film “Princess Mononoke” has gone viral on Twitter.

In a clip taken from the 1998 documentary “How Princess Mononoke Was Born,” Akihiro Miwa, the voice of Moro, goes through multiple takes to find the perfect tone for the wolf god’s mocking laugh.

Tickets for Ghibli Park in Japan now on sale

  • Studio Ghibli fans can now purchase tickets for the new Ghibli Park in Japan.
  • The theme park will feature attractions and exhibits from various Studio Ghibli films, including “My Neighbor Totoro” and “Kiki’s Delivery Service.”
  • Ghibli Park is located in Aichi Earth Expo Memorial Park.
  • Three of the five planned areas will be ready by the park’s scheduled opening in November.

Tickets for the grand opening of Japan’s Ghibli Park in November are now available for purchase.

The tickets can be purchased through Ghibli Park’s official website. Tickets may not be purchased on the day of the park’s opening, Nov. 1, so reservations will be required. Admission fees for each area of the park are listed on the website as well.

‘My Neighbor Totoro’ forest that inspired Hayao Miyazaki classic to become a protected preserve

  • On June 2, Tokorozawa, Japan, Mayor Masato Fujimoto declared that the city would be preserving Totoro's forest.
  • Totoro no Mori, or Totoro's forest, is a forest located in Sayama Hills. The forest was the main source of inspiration for Hayao Miyazaki’s 1998 film, “My Neighbor Totoro.”
  • The project is expected to cost 2.6 billion yen (approximately $19.35 million) and cover the 8.6-acre forest.
  • The funds will be provided through city funds, crowdfunding, Miyazaki’s personal contributions and donations by Studio Ghibli.

Totoro no Mori, the Japanese forest that inspired Hayao Miyazaki’s Studio Ghibli film “My Neighbor Totoro,” will become a protected nature preserve.

The forest where protagonist sisters Satsuki and Mei first meet Totoro in the movie is modeled after Totoro no Mori, as is the town where they live.

Cedar tree in Japan bears uncanny resemblance to Totoro from Studio Ghibli’s ‘My Neighbor Totoro’

TOTORO TREE
  • Kosugi no Osugi (The Great Cedar of Kosugi), known by locals and visitors as the Totoro Tree, has been gaining a strong following online thanks to its striking resemblance to Totoro from Studio Ghibli’s 1988 film “My Neighbor Totoro.”
  • The “double-eared” cedar tree is 20 meters (approximately 65.62 feet) tall and can be found in the rural town of Sakegawa in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan.
  • “There was a forest where it looks like you can meet Totoro,” Japanese photographer Yamadayama wrote in a tweet on Friday highlighting the tree.

A “double-eared” cedar tree in Japan has been gaining a strong following online thanks to its striking resemblance to the ever-so-cuddly forest spirit Totoro, a character from Studio Ghibli’s 1988 film “My Neighbor Totoro.”

Kosugi no Osugi (The Great Cedar of Kosugi), affectionately known by locals and visitors as the Totoro Tree, is 20 meters (approximately 65.62 feet) tall and can be found in the rural town of Sakegawa in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan.

Unofficial Ghibli cafe in Nagoya serves ‘Princess Mononoke’ jerky, Calcifer’s bacon and egg breakfast

  • An unofficial Studio Ghibli cafe inspired by Ghibli characters and references caught the eyes of representatives from Studio Ghibli.
  • The cafe, called Kodama, is located in the Osu neighborhood of Nagoya, Japan.
  • Kodama’s interior design features memorabilia from Ghibli’s films, including window stickers of the soot sprites from “My Neighbor Totoro,” plush dolls of the spirits from “Spirited Away” and other Ghibli character figurines.
  • The cafe’s menu includes various Ghibli-themed food items such as Calcifer’s bacon and egg set from “Howl’s Moving Castle” and a rice omelet in the shape of Mei’s straw hat from “My Neighbor Totoro.”
  • Representatives from Studio Ghibli, including the Ghibli Park’s designer and planner Goro Miyazaki, visited the cafe and positively reacted to its design.

On May 18, representatives from Studio Ghibli tweeted of their positive experience at an unofficial Studio Ghibli cafe located in the Osu neighborhood of Nagoya, Japan.

Inspired by the tiny forest spirits with rattling heads from the Ghibli film “Princess Mononoke,” the cafe named Kodama features a full menu and interior design filled with Ghibli film references and memorabilia. 

Studio Ghibli producer reveals why Jiji no longer speaks at the end of ‘Kiki’s Delivery Service’

Studio Ghibli Kiki's Delivery Service
  • Since the release of the beloved Studio Ghibli film “Kiki’s Delivery Service” in 1989, Japanese fans have long wondered why the young witch Kiki can no longer hear her talking cat Jiji by the end of the film.
  • The official Twitter account of Nippon TV’s “Kinyo Roadshow” shared behind-the-scenes information last week that could help solve the mystery for fans.
  • “It appears that Kiki is now able to fly again but Jiji remains silent. Actually, it’s not because Kiki’s magical powers have weakened, but because Kiki has progressed to a new stage that Jiji has returned to being a ‘just a cat,'” the “Kinyo Roadshow” account wrote.
  • Another tweet provided new information from one of the film’s producers: “Regarding this topic, this is what producer Toshio Suzuki has to say: ‘Jiji is not just a pet, he’s another self [for Kiki]. So when she’s conversing with Jiji, she’s really just talking to herself.”

A Studio Ghibli producer shared information about “Kiki’s Delivery Service” that could help Japanese fans solve a decades-long mystery surrounding the beloved film.

“Kiki’s Delivery Service” tells the story of Kiki, a 13-year-old witch who lives with Jiji, her talking cat, in a seaside town for a year. In the film’s final act, Kiki loses her magic abilities, making her unable to fly or talk to Jiji. She eventually regains her ability to fly, but she can no longer communicate with her cat, as suggested by his “meow” in the final scene of the film’s original Japanese version.

Studio Ghibli theme park announces ticket prices and online reservation procedure

  • The Studio Ghibli theme park in Japan, currently under construction, announced its admission ticket prices and online reservation procedures on Friday. 
  • The Hill of Youth, Dondoko Forest and Ghibli’s Grand Warehouse museum-like attractions will be the park’s first sections to open.
  • Ghibli’s Grand Warehouse will cost 2,000 yen (about $15) for adults and 1,000 yen (about $8) for children during weekdays.
  • During the weekends, Ghibli’s Grand Warehouse will be slightly more expensive at a price of 2,500 yen (about $19) for adults and 1,250 yen ( about $10) for children. 
  • Dondoko Forest and Hill of Youth will cost 1,000 yen (about $8) for adults and 500 yen (about $4) for children.
  • Tickets must be purchased in advance through Ghibli's online reservation system, and the ticket will only be valid for the selected reservation date.
  • Although the entire theme park will not be ready, the first three areas are set to open on Nov. 1.

The Studio Ghibli theme park, which is currently under construction in Japan’s Aichi Prefecture, announced on Friday ticket prices for its first three sections as well as its online reservation policy. 

Although the theme park is set to open on Nov. 1, only three sections will be open to the public. This includes the museum-like Ghibli’s Grand Warehouse; Dondoko Forest, the location of Mei and Satsuki’s house in “My Neighbor Totoro;” and Hill of Youth, which will feature locations seen in “Whisper of the Heart” and “The Cat Returns.”

‘My Neighbor Totoro’ gets London stage play adaptation produced by Ghibli composer Joe Hisaishi

My Neighbor Totoro stage play
  • Studio Ghibli and Britain’s Royal Shakespeare Company are bringing Hayao Miyazaki’s 1988 animated feature film “My Neighbor Totoro” to the stage starting on October 8.
  • The new adaptation, which is produced in collaboration with Nippon TV and English theater company Improbable, will run for 15 weeks at The Barbican Theatre in London until Jan. 21, 2023.
  • Renowned Japanese composer Joe Hisaishi will serve as the stage play’s executive producer and will collaborate with playwright Tom Morton-Smith, stage director Phelim McDermott and set designer Tom Pye, among others.
  • Hisaishi, who has composed several iconic scores for Studio Ghibli films such as “My Neighbor Totoro” and “Spirited Away,” shared that Miyazaki only agreed to bring the classic anime to the world of theater if the composer was involved in the project.
  • “I was involved with the original animation film, and so I feel strongly about not harming the film,” the Japanese composer said.
  • Set in Japan in the 1950s, “My Neighbor Totoro” follows the story of two young siblings who move from Tokyo to the countryside. There, they meet several spirits and magical creatures, including the ancient protector of the forest who they call Totoro.

The beloved 1988 Studio Ghibli classic “My Neighbor Totoro” is coming to the stage in London this October with the blessing of its legendary creator, Hayao Miyazaki.

Set to make its debut at The Barbican Theatre in London on October 8, the stage adaptation of “My Neighbor Totoro” is being developed by Britain’s Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) in partnership with Studio Ghibli. The new adaptation, which is produced in collaboration with Nippon TV and English theater company Improbable, will run for 15 weeks until Jan. 21, 2023.

Neil Gaiman explains why he was cut out of the English movie poster for ‘Princess Mononoke’

mononoke
  • Neil Gaiman has spoken out about why he was excluded from the film poster of Studio Ghibli’s “Princess Mononoke” after writing the script for the English dubbed version.
  • The “Sandman” and “American Gods” author revealed in response to a tweet from a fan that his name "was taken off the poster by Miramax execs who were told by Ghibli that there were too many names on the poster.”
  • Miramax had originally wanted Quentin Tarantino to pen the English script, but the “Kill Bill” director ultimately turned down the position.

Neil Gaiman continues to speak out about why he was excluded from the film poster of Studio Ghibli’s “Princess Mononoke” after writing the script for the English-dubbed version in 1999.

The “Sandman” and “American Gods” author revealed in response to a tweet from a fan that his name “was taken off the poster by Miramax execs who were told by Ghibli that there were too many names on the poster. So they kept theirs on and took mine off. Which wasn’t quite what Ghibli had intended.”