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rap

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South Korean rapper Khakii is ‘Floating’ with Tiger JK on debut studio album ‘TIDE’

  • South Korean rapper Khakii released his debut studio album “TIDE” on Saturday.
  • The album features seven songs, and the title track “Floating” features Korean American rapper and record producer Tiger JK. 
  • Other tracks on “TIDE,” such as “LOST” and “Choices,” feature artists such as SM Entertainment singer-songwriter Moon Sujin and Khakii’s labelmate Colde.
  • Khakii signed with Colde’s label WAVY in 2019 and debuted with the single “BASS.”

South Korean rapper Khakii released “TIDE,” his first full-length album, on Saturday. 

The album’s title track “Floating” features Tiger JK.  “Tide” also features six other songs: “On The Beach,” “LOST” (featuring SM Entertainment singer-songwriter Moon Sujin), “White Night,” “Laundry,” “Low Tide (2020)” and “Choices” (featuring Khakii’s labelmate Colde). Khakii wrote every track on the album and was assisted by the featured artists on their respective collaborations. 

Tiger JK gives shows-off his ‘POV’ in new single and music video

  • Korean-American rapper Tiger JK dropped his new single and music video “POV” on Tuesday.
  • The track is penned by the rapper and composed by Feel Ghood Music’s in-house producer Zoey Cho, who has worked on other hits like Bibi’s “I’m good at goodbyes” in 2020.
  • Chicago based artist Jarvis Kim, who went viral via Simu Liu’s social media shoutout for his “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings” artwork, created the album cover art for “POV.”
  • Tiger JK founded Feel Ghood Music in 2013, and is a founding member of the Korean hip-hop group Drunken Tiger.

Feel Ghood Music founder Tiger JK released his new single and music video “POV” on Tuesday. 

In a press release from Feel Ghood Music, the Korean American rapper’s latest track is described as “a multi-layered reflection on the dichotomy between the past and the current loves of one’s life – all to the deep 808s of hip hop trap, lush synths, and the soulful background vocals of R&B singer Twlv.” 

Ice Cube’s alleged anti-Asian, anti-Semitic past resurfaces after news of NFL partnership

  • The NFL recently announced its partnership with Ice Cube’s economic equity initiative Contract With Black America (CWBA) Institute.
  • The partnership will focus on “identifying league-wide opportunities in the financial, tech, and production sectors, with a concentration on increasing spending to Black business nationwide to help close America’s racial and economic wealth gap.”
  • Ice Cube, whose real name is O'Shea Jackson, has come under fire over the years for alleged anti-Semitic and anti-Asian lyrics in his 1991 songs “No Vaseline” and “Black Korea.”
  • Ice Cube most recently drew flak for posting tweets in support of religious leader Louis Farrakhan, who has called Jews “wicked deceivers” and compared them to “termites.”
  • To date, Ice Cube has reportedly not apologized for the controversies and has threatened to sue journalists who referred to him as “anti-Semitic.”

Critics have called attention to Ice Cube’s alleged anti-Asian and anti-Semitic past following the NFL’s announcement of its partnership with the rapper’s Contract With Black America (CWBA) Institute, an economic equity initiative.

The NFL, which has been aiming to boost its work with Black-owned businesses, announced the partnership on June 30. The collaboration is set to focus on “identifying league-wide opportunities in the financial, tech, and production sectors, with a concentration on increasing spending to Black business nationwide to help close America’s racial and economic wealth gap.”

Kris Wu is Legit, But This Ariana Grande ‘Drama’ Never Was

Certain stories write themselves too easily. When Kris Wu took up six of the top seven spots on iTunes’ U.S. charts after releasing his debut solo studio album, leaving Ariana Grande’s viral single “Thank U, Next” at fourth, accusations of foul play ran amok on Twitter. Wu quickly dropped from iTunes rankings afterwards. Grande herself ended up liking a tweet which insinuated Wu’s U.S. chart success was the result of bots.

What if I told you the Chinese-American War began not from Trump-fueled trade disputes or the governance of Taiwan, but rather from Kris Wu’s “Antares” album? In a period of high blood pressure and immense, often understandable sensitivity, the mere appearance of a beef, a semblance of disrespect towards one of China’s biggest stars from one of America’s biggest stars, was enough to conjure tweets like these: