Browsing Tag

study

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Short kings, rise and grind: Study says 5’6″ men need to earn $175,000 more a year to be as desirable as 6’ men

  • Finance influencer Vivian, popularly known as “Your Rich BFF,” broke down a study on online dating that found men who are 5 feet 6 inches must earn an additional $175,000 per year on average to be seen as desirable as men who are 6 feet, with the number being even higher for Asian men.
  • In the clip posted to her Instagram account on Friday, Vivian began by asking, “How much is six inches worth?”
  • Referring to a study conducted by the University of Chicago in 2006 titled “What Makes You Click? — Mate Preferences and Matching Outcomes in Online Dating,” Vivian noted the trade-offs between height and income.
  • The number increases with shorter heights, with men who are 5 feet, for example, needing to make an additional $317,000 in income.
  • Also included in the study are the income-ethnicity trade offs, which shows that for equal chances with a white woman as a white man, an Asian man has to make on average a whopping $247,000 in additional annual income.

Finance influencer Vivian broke down a study on online dating that found shorter men must earn more per year to be seen as desirable as taller men, with the number being even higher for Asian men. 

In the clip posted to her Instagram account on Friday, Vivian, better known by her online handle “Your Rich BFF,” begins by asking, “How much is six inches worth?”

New study explains why you should spend less time thinking and more time sleeping

  • A new study published in the journal “Current Biology” on Thursday explained why thinking hard for several hours makes individuals tired and influences how people make low-cost action decisions.
  • Prolonged intense cognitive work causes a build up of potentially toxic byproducts in the prefrontal cortex of a human’s brain, which in turn affects an individual’s control over their decisions.
  • This directs one to perform actions that do not require effort or to do nothing at all as the cognitive fatigue takes hold.
  • Mathias Pessiglione, one of the authors of the study, said that there is no known way to avoid this mental limitation, but she pointed toward the practice of good sleep.

A new study explained why thinking hard for several hours makes individuals tired and influences how people make low-cost action decisions.

The researchers of the study, which was published in the journal “Current Biology” on Thursday, found that prolonged intense cognitive work causes a buildup of potentially toxic byproducts in the prefrontal cortex of a human’s brain. This buildup then affects an individual’s control over their decisions, causing one to do things that do not require effort or to do nothing at all as the cognitive fatigue takes hold..

Study finds that Japanese children walk differently from those in other countries

  • A research study found that Japanese children develop a different manner of walking compared to those in other countries.
  • The study’s co-author believes that factors such as lifestyle and build have an impact on Japanese children’s gait, a complex and unconscious motor pattern.
  • Among the different age groups, the study found four key differences.
  • Researchers hope to use the study in assessing developmental changes and walking patterns as well as gait abnormalities in children.

According to a new study linking body movement patterns and health, Japanese children walk differently from those in other countries. 

The study, which was recently published in the journal “Scientific Reports,” found that gait patterns among Japanese children aged 6 to 12 vary from those in other developed countries. 

‘Mind After Midnight’: Human brains are not meant to be awake late at night, says new study

  • An article published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Network Psychology in March suggests that when humans are awake after midnight, neurophysiological changes in the brain lead to more negative thoughts and harmful and impulsive behaviors.
  • The study suggests that the brain is not meant to be awake after midnight as decisions are likely to lead to addictive behaviors, including overeating, drinking, gambling or criminal activity.
  • The changes also cause people to see the world more negatively than they typically do during the day.
  • A 2019 study published in the journal Sleep Medicine found that young and middle-aged adults in Asia get the least sleep due to “higher work and educational demands in Asian countries.”

A new study suggests that when humans are awake after midnight, neurophysiological changes in the brain lead to more negative outcomes.

The researchers of the hypothesis, which was published in the journal Frontiers in Network Psychology in March, are calling for new studies on the human brain after they discovered evidence that when humans are awake during the biological circadian night, neurophysiological changes in the brain causes them to view the world negatively, engage in harmful behaviors and make impulsive decisions.

Matcha boosts sleep quality and emotional perception, study finds

  • A new study from Japan shows that matcha can improve sleep quality and social cognition — specifically emotional perception based on facial expression.
  • Ninety-nine men and women aged 60 to 85 took part in a year-long clinical trial which investigated the effects of daily matcha consumption.
  • The treatment group was given matcha in the form of a capsule, which suggests that those who consume it in the form of sweets or confections may reap the same benefits as those who drink it.
  • The findings were presented during the recently concluded Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in San Diego.

Matcha may help improve the quality of sleep and emotional perception in those who consume it, a new study from Japan has found.

Traditionally consumed in East Asia, the powdered green tea plant has grown in popularity around the world in recent years for its rich and unique taste, but the latest research could encourage more people to try it for its health benefits.

Asians more likely to be hospitalized with COVID than other Bay Area racial groups, study finds

Asian covid
  • A study published in the Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities on Tuesday found that Bay Area residents of Asian descent were more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19 than any other racial or ethnic group in 2020.
  • While the study also included Black, Hispanic and white residents, Asians were the only racial group whose age, income, health insurance status and medical comorbidities did not fully account for their higher risk of hospitalization.
  • “What is interesting is that even when we count for all socioeconomic factors and health profile, just being Asian alone still conferred excess risk for having severe COVID,” the study’s co-author, University of California, San Francisco, ophthalmologist Dr. David Hwang, was quoted as saying. “We don’t fully understand the reasons for that.”
  • Hwang cited other potential reasons, such as the rise of anti-Asian violence, which may have prevented many from seeking medical care during the early stages.
  • Another possibility he mentioned was language barriers, as many Asians in the Bay Area may have found it difficult to find a healthcare provider that spoke their own language or dialect.

A recent study has found that Bay Area residents of Asian descent were more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19 than any other racial or ethnic group in the area in 2020.

The research, co-authored by a University of California, San Francisco, researcher and published in the Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities on Tuesday, noted that the heightened risk among Asians cannot be fully explained by socioeconomic factors or pre-existing medical conditions. 

Identical twins raised apart in Korea and US have similar personality traits but different IQs

  • A study that looked into the different factors that affect human development compared the characteristics of a woman who grew up in South Korea to that of her twin sister, who was raised in the U.S.
  • The sisters were born in Seoul in 1974, but were separated from each other at the age of 2 after one of them got lost at a market and was eventually adopted by American parents.
  • The twin who grew up in Korea described living in a loving and harmonious household, while the one who lived in the U.S. shared an upbringing with regular conflict and the eventual divorce of her adoptive parents.
  • Published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, the study found that the twins somehow developed similar personality traits but significantly different IQ levels.

A pair of identical twins who grew up in separate countries have somehow developed similar personality traits but significantly different IQ levels, a recent study has found.  

In the study published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, researchers from Kookmin University in Seoul and California State University compared the characteristics of a woman who grew up in South Korea to that of her sister, who was raised in the U.S. 

Japanese scientists grow living, self-healing human skin that can be put on robots

  • Scientists have developed living human skin for robots that looks and moves like real skin. The skin is also capable of self-repair and repelling water.
  • In a study published by the journal Matter on Thursday, researchers at the University of Tokyo explained their method of using a coating of skin tissue on robot fingers.
  • The research team hopes to use their development in aiding those in need of prosthetics or cosmetic and pharmaceutical skin development.
  • The researchers are now studying how to make the skin tissue survive for longer as well as creating more advanced features such as hair follicles and sweat glands.

A team of researchers at the University of Tokyo developed living skin tissue coatings for robots that can perform basic functions such as self-healing and repelling water.

In a study published on Thursday by the journal Matter, lead author and engineer Takeuchi Shoji and a team of researchers revealed the development of human skin tissue for robots using “a coating material.” The coating is able to mimic the appearance and movement of human skin.

Physical gestures could improve math understanding, researchers say

  • Researchers from China, Iran and Australia are suggesting a gesture-based technique to boost understanding of basic math concepts among primary school children.
  • Their paper, published in Integrative Psychology and Behavioral Science, looked into previous behavioral studies and applied psychological concepts about the use of hand motions and gestures in enhancing higher-order cognitive engagement.
  • The team noted that transferring and translating these findings into the classroom could boost the learning of basic math concepts, such as shapes, volume and quantity, among primary school children.
  • The researchers are set to test this proposed method of teaching by conducting studies involving multiple groups of children from different countries.

Researchers from China, Iran and Australia are suggesting a gesture-based technique that could boost the learning and understanding of basic math concepts.

The paper, published in Integrative Psychology and Behavioral Science in April, reviewed previous behavioral studies and applied psychological concepts about the use of hand motions and gestures in enhancing higher-order cognitive engagement. 

Study finds gap in college success among Asian American and Pacific Islander students in California

College gap AANHPI California
  • A study conducted by the nonprofit Campaign for College Opportunity, titled “The State of Higher Education for Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Californians,” found gaps in college access and success among Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander students (AANHPI) in California.
  • The May 2022 study showed the disaggregated AANHPI student data, which consists of 30 different ethnic groups.
  • “Asian Americans and NHPIs have a reputation for being successful students, with data on academic outcomes often painting the portrait of a high-performing group, especially for East and South Asian Americans,” the study said.

A study conducted by the nonprofit Campaign for College Opportunity found gaps in college access and success among Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander students (AANHPI) in California, home to the largest population of Asian Americans in the country.

The May 2022 study, titled “The State of Higher Education for Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Californians,” showed the disaggregated AANHPI student data, which consists of 30 different ethnic groups.

Chinese scientists develop ‘vampiric’ technique that may reverse aging process

  • Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences published a study that involved surgically connecting the circulatory systems of old mice to those of younger specimens, known to scientists as heterochronic parabiosis (HP).
  • The introduction of younger blood rejuvenated the older rodents’ adult stem cells and surrounding somatic cells, causing them to live longer.
  • The new HP stem cell procedure that the researchers developed appeared to have temporarily reversed the degeneration of the older specimens’ vital organs and tissues.
  • According to the authors of the study, their findings may offer relevant data for further research into anti-aging medical treatment.

Scientists in China may have found a way to potentially reverse the aging process via a technique that can be described as “vampiric.”

Published last month in the peer-reviewed journal Cell Stem Cell, the study led by the Chinese Academy of Sciences involved surgically connecting the circulatory systems of old mice to those of younger specimens. After being injected with blood taken from the young mice, the old ones reportedly lived longer.