Browsing Tag

language

19 posts

American College Students Want to Learn Korean More Than Ever Because of K-Pop

The number of students learning Korean in universities throughout the United States has increased almost exponentially over the past 10 years, and it’s most likely due to the incredible popularity of K-pop.

According to the U.S. Modern Language Association, the number of American university students enrolled in Korean language classes has doubled between 2006 and 2016, Vice reported. The MLA attributes the rise in demand for learning the Korean language to the effects of the Korean wave, which includes the popularity of K-dramas, global sensations like K-pop group BTS, and even the prominence of Korean skin care routines and products.

Japanese Soccer Star Drops F-Bomb After Mispronouncing a Word

Keisuke Honda

Famous Japanese soccer player Keisuke Honda apologized for his adorable slip up during an interview in Australia last week when he mispronounced the word “fact” in an unfortunate way.

At one point during his talk with reporters last week, Honda told them “I have to take care of myself. It’s bad but it’s real, it’s fact.” A brief moment of silence clouded the event venue before Melbourne Victory’s head coach Kevin Muscat stepped in to clear the air saying, “Fact. Fact issue,” according to SoraNews24.

Why I Used to Dread Learning Chinese Until I Went to College

During middle school, students are expected to have minimal exposure to a language other than English. I had Spanish and French for two hours a week in 7th and 8th grade, and I was not interested in either. When high school came, we were allowed to choose between Spanish, French (though this department was later cut because of the cleaver dubbed “Insufficient Funds” that looms over every public school), and German. I was mildly interested in French, but I wasn’t feeling the “yearn to learn” for any of those. Then, my guidance counselor made an announcement that would alter my linguistic career forever: I could take Mandarin Chinese online.

I couldn’t wait. I enrolled as soon as possible and felt hope and excitement for learning a foreign language. I signed up because I wanted to learn the language and learn more about the culture. At that point in my life, I hardly knew anything about Chinese culture. I had the face of a Chinese person, with the values of an American and cultural knowledge that could match the amount of a tourist. This online class was an opportunity to learn and enrich my then-deprived cultural identity.

Kenya Will Start Teaching Mandarin in All Primary Schools Starting 2020

mandarin

To better pave the road for trade and connection with China, Kenya is preparing to teach Mandarin lessons in classrooms starting next year.

CEO of Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development (KICD), Julius Jwan, recently spoke with Chinese state media Xinhua News, revealing the design, scope, and sequence of the Mandarin syllabus that is now finished and ready to roll out sometime in 2020.

New Character That Means ‘Poor’ and ‘Ugly’ is Extremely Relatable to Chinese Millennials

chinese millennials

A newly-created pessimistic character is garnering attention from Chinese millennials and the younger population, saying that it perfectly describes them.

This new character, “qiou,” is a combination of three characters: (qiong) that means poor, (chou), which is translated as ugly, and also (tu), meaning earth. If put together, the character essentially reads as meaning “poor as dirt and ugly,” according to Shanghaiist.

Why You’re an Idiot If You Think People Should Only Speak English in America

In the wake of rampant and terrifyingly blatant racism that transports us into an alternate reality stuck in the previous century or older, we become curious of socio-cultural events that would somehow explain the roots of such idiocy.

For starters, the least one can do is get facts straight, so that in the unfortunate happenstance that another idiot forces someone to speak a language because of where his/her feet are, one hell of a schooling session can break loose.