Browsing Tag

pixar

19 posts

Entertainment review YouTuber criticizes ‘Turning Red’ for not recognizing 9/11’s cultural impact

Turning Red review
  • YouTuber TheMysteriousMrEnter, also known as Mr. Enter, became the subject of online jokes and memes for his April 14 video review of Pixar's “Turning Red,” in which he criticizes the animated film for not recognizing the cultural impact of the 9/11 attacks.
  • Twitter user @CocoaFox023 shared a clip of the review to Twitter the day after the YouTube video was posted. The clip has garnered over 8.4 million views on the microblogging platform.
  • “This film takes place less than a year after the September 11 terrorist attacks. I bring this up because it radically altered the culture of the time in ways that make this movie feel exceptionally ignorant of the time,” Mr. Enter said in his video review.
  • His remarks prompted Twitter users to generate a wave of memes.

A YouTuber became the subject of online jokes and memes due to his review of Pixar’s “Turning Red,” in which he criticizes the animated film for not recognizing the cultural impact of the 9/11 attacks.

YouTuber TheMysteriousMrEnter, also known as Mr. Enter, uploaded his review titled “Turning Red is a mixed bag” on April 14. The video has over 77,000 views at the time of this writing.

‘Turning Red’ criticized by some parents for embracing female puberty and menstruation

turning red period
  • Pixar’s “Turning Red” has drawn negative criticism from parents who are uncomfortable with exposing children to what they deem “adult topics” for scenes in which the characters discuss female puberty and menstruation.
  • Chinese Canadian director Domee Shi and Chinese American production designer Rona Liu, on the other hand, say they set out to depict an honest story that aims to help young women feel heard and seen.
  • The PG-rated film has also garnered praise for destigmatizing and normalizing menstruation.

Pixar’s latest animated feature “Turning Red” has drawn negative criticism from parents for including scenes in which characters discuss female puberty and menstruation.

Directed by Chinese Canadian filmmaker Domee Shi, the film follows the story of Meilin “Mei” Lee, a 13-year-old Chinese Canadian girl from Toronto who discovers that she has inherited the ability to transform into a giant red panda when emotionally provoked. The PG-rated coming-of-age story is an allegory for puberty that many have also praised for normalizing the taboo topic of menstruation.

‘Turning Red’: 19 surprising Easter eggs you might have missed while watching Pixar’s new movie

Pixar’s latest animated feature “Turning Red” features several Easter eggs while also paying homage to Toronto, where Chinese Canadian filmmaker Domee Shi grew up.

“Turning Red” follows the story of Meilin “Mei” Lee, a 13-year-old Chinese Canadian girl from Toronto who turns into a giant red panda whenever she gets too excited or stressed.

‘We can all learn something from them’: Pixar execs praise all-female ‘Turning Red’ creative leadership team

turning red-2
  • Chinese Canadian filmmaker Domee Shi, who helmed the 2018 Oscar-winning animated short film “Bao,” assembled an all-female creative leadership team for her feature film directorial debut “Turning Red.”
  • Shi co-wrote the screenplay of the feature film with playwright Julia Cho.
  • “Turning Red” follows the story of a Chinese Canadian teenager who transforms into a giant red panda whenever she gets excited.
  • According to Pixar President Jim Morris, the film took four years to complete, which makes it “one of the fastest films” Pixar has ever made.
  • “Turning Red” is set for a March 11 release on Disney Plus.

Pixar has lauded the all-female creative leadership team behind its latest animated film “Turning Red” for creating “one of [its] fastest films ever.” 

“Turning Red,” which follows the story of a Chinese Canadian teenager who transforms into a giant red panda, is the feature film directorial debut of Chinese Canadian filmmaker Domee Shi, who helmed the 2018 Oscar-winning animated short film “Bao.”

Koreans take issue with scene from Pixar’s ‘Turning Red’ that allegedly depicts hanbok as Chinese hanfu

turning red
  • Pixar’s upcoming film “Turning Red” has caused a stir amongst Koreans who are criticizing the movie’s alleged portrayal of hanboks as traditionally Chinese.
  • In a teaser scene meant to illustrate Chinese folklore and culture, a scroll painting of two children being held by a red panda is shown. Korean internet users have pointed out that the childrens’ attire closely resembles a hanbok, a traditional Korean dress, rather than a hanfu, a traditional Chinese dress.
  • Online communities in Korea posted illustrations of traditional Chinese attire to draw comparisons with the film’s depiction of a hanfu.
  • These claims have surfaced amid ongoing controversies, including with Vogue and at the Olympic opening ceremonies, surrounding the differences between Chinese and Korean traditional attire and the origins of the hanbok.

Korean online communities are claiming that Pixar’s upcoming film “Turning Red” depicts a Korean hanbok as traditional Chinese clothing after a teaser trailer showed two children wearing attire that allegedly resembles a hanbok rather than a hanfu.

In the film, a 13-year-old Chinese Canadian student, Meilin “Mei” Lee, learns about her Chinese ancestry after developing the ability to transform into a giant red panda. The teaser trailer shows a scene in which Mei looks at a scroll showing a red panda with children to illustrate the historical connection between the red panda folklore and her Chinese heritage.

‘I was Mei growing up’: Women-led team behind Pixar’s ‘Turning Red’ explain why ‘authenticity’ is key

turning red
  • In Disney Pixar’s new coming of age movie, 13-year-old Mei Lee confronts the monstrous difficulty of puberty and becoming who you really are.
  • The woman-led team behind “Turning Red” spoke to NextShark about the challenges behind creating a movie that felt both universal but also distinctly Asian American.
  • “In light of all the terrible things that have happened to our community, it’s more important than ever to really showcase these stories and put our faces out there to tell the world hey, we’re here, we have emotions and complex feelings and relationships, and the issues we go through are universal,” director Domee Shi said.
  • Art director Rona Liu added: “The key word that comes to mind is just authenticity. The story of ‘Turning Red’ is so personal to Domee, but also to all of us making it. I was Mei growing up.”
  • “Turning Red” will be released on Disney Plus on March 11.

In her first feature-length Pixar film, Oscar-winning director Domee Shi seeks to unpack complex questions about Asian mothers & daughters, but also to tell a coming-of-age story that feels universal.

In the trailer for “Turning Red,” a confident Mei Lee earns an A-plus on her test, shows off her flute skills, cares for the community temple, leads an environmental protest and shows off the matching friendship bracelets she shares with her three best friends.  

Pixar’s Latest Short Has a Korean Grandma Struggling to Give Her Grandson a Better Life

pixar wind

“Wind,” Pixar’s latest short, is a tribute to the sacrifices of a woman who raised her children in the aftermath of the Korean War before bringing them to the United States for a better life.

The film, produced through Pixar’s SparkShorts program — which allows the studio’s employees to create their own projects with limited time and budget — is written and directed by Eddie Chang.

Pixar Makes History With the First Filipino-American Animated Story

Pixar made history this Filipino American History Month with their new short film titled “Float,” which features Filipino animated characters for the first time.

Pixar writer and director Bobby Rubio spoke to Action News about his project, saying, “As a Filipino-American and it being Filipino History Month, I am super proud that this is coming out, and we are making history.”