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korean american

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pH-1 releases new EP ‘But For Now Leave Me Alone’ and series of music videos

pH-1
  • Korean American rapper pH-1 dropped his new EP, “BUT FOR NOW LEAVE ME ALONE,” and a string of music videos on Thursday.
  • The album features 13 tracks, including the pre-release single “Mr. Bad.”
  • Alongside the album came two music videos: one for “YUPPIE TING,” featuring Blasé, and a single video for both “ZOMBIES” and “TIPSY.”
  • PH-1 is a founding member of H1GHR MUSIC, and has collaborated with artists like Chungha, Mamamoo’s Wheein, TXT and Jay Park, to name a few.

Korean American rapper pH-1, born Park Junwon, released a new EP titled “BUT FOR NOW LEAVE ME ALONE” and accompanying music videos on Thursday.  

According to a press release about the latest work, the album “continues to tell the story of the artist taking the dim-lit road in search for security. Centered on breaking the bright and vibrant perception that fans have of the Korean-American rapper.”

‘Why is the story still unknown?’: ‘Free Chol Soo Lee’ co-directors refuse to let America forget Korean American wrongfully convicted of murder in 1973

Julie Ha and Eugene Yi’s six-year journey to illuminate the life and legacy of Chol Soo Lee, a Korean American man falsely convicted of murder, began at the end of his story.

While Ha first learned of him through her mentor K.W. Lee, a journalist who played an instrumental role in raising awareness of the injustices that plagued the wrongly convicted man, she truly came to grips with the gravity of Chol Soo Lee’s situation at his funeral.

Man shot to death after Fort Worth car accident identified as ‘pillar’ of Dallas’ Asian community

  • The Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Office identified the man who was shot and killed following a minor traffic accident on South University Drive in Fort Worth, Dallas, on Monday as Chin "Jin" Shin, a 43-year-old Korean American business owner.
  • Shin, who died from gunshot wounds, was pronounced dead at the scene when police arrived. Authorities ruled his death a homicide.
  • Born in South Korea, Shin immigrated to the United States in 1983 at a young age. He reportedly grew up in various parts of Louisiana and North Carolina before settling in Texas.
  • Shin was the owner of Encore Family Karaoke at Goodnight Lane in Dallas and was also the co-owner of the Dallas branch of Korean restaurant DanSungSa.
  • Peng Dang, a friend of Shin from Arlington, described the man as a “pillar" of Dallas’ Asian community.
  • A GoFundMe campaign to help with Shin's funeral expenses was created on Wednesday and has so far raised over $54,000 of its $250,000 goal.

Authorities have identified the man killed in a shooting following a minor traffic accident on South University Drive in Fort Worth, Dallas, on Monday.

The Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed that Chin “Jin” Shin, a 43-year-old business owner and a “pillar” of Dallas’ Asian community, died from gunshot wounds. His death has been ruled as a homicide.

Rapper pH-1 introduces ‘Mr. Bad’ in new single and music video

pH-1
  • Korean-American rapper pH-1 dropped his new single and music video “Mr. Bad” featuring Woo Wonjae on Tuesday.
  • The track will feature on pH-1’s upcoming album, his first in three years.
  • The H1ghr Music artist was discovered in 2016 by Jay Park and debuted in 2017 with his EP “The Island Kid.”
  • Previous artists pH-1 has collaborated with include Chungha, Mamamoo’s Wheein, TXT and Jay Park.

Korean American rapper pH-1, born Park Junwon (Harry Park), released a new single and music video titled “Mr. Bad” featuring Woo Wonjae on Tuesday.

The track will be on pH-1’s forthcoming album, his first in three years. According to a press release from label H1ghr Music, “Mr. Bad” is a turn for nice guy Harry Park, who “finally tackles his demons and temptations-he’s confronted throughout his career — whether it be parties, alcohol, or just friends, pH-1 was inspired by his experience of how being bad can feel good.”

Miss America Emma Broyles shares ‘incredible experience’ of flying with Air Force Thunderbirds

  • Korean American Miss America titleholder Emma Broyles, 21, was selected to participate in the U.S. Air Force’s recent flight performance practice, where she was given the opportunity to fly in an F-16 Thunderbird.
  • On Friday, the beauty queen joined the Air Force Thunderbirds as they rehearsed for the Arctic Thunder Open House, which occurred at U.S. military facility Joint Base Elmendorf–Richardson in Anchorage, Alaska, over the weekend.
  • “Yesterday I had one of the most incredible experiences of my life thanks to the @afthunderbirds,” Broyles wrote in an Instagram post on Sunday. “Flying in an F-16 is an experience like no other, and I am endlessly grateful to have had the opportunity to do so.”
  • The Thunderbirds also took to Instagram to highlight the past work of Broyles, who has “spent the last 15 years as a volunteer, coach, speaker, supporter, and advocate for students with and without intellectual disabilities to become champions of inclusion within their school and community.”
  • Broyles, who was crowned the 100th anniversary Miss America on December 16, 2021, is the first Alaskan contestant and the first Korean American contestant to win the Miss America title.

Emma Broyles, the first Korean American to hold the title of Miss America, took to the skies in an F-16 Thunderbird while participating in a recent U.S. Air Force flight performance practice.

According to Broyles, 21, she was the V.I.P. chosen last week to fly with the Thunderbirds, the premier demonstration team of the Air Force.

‘Free Chol Soo Lee’ documentary trailer investigates racial profiling of innocent man on death row

  • A trailer released on Wednesday for the upcoming Sundance documentary “Free Chol Soo Lee” investigates the racial profiling of Chol Soo Lee, a Korean American death row inmate wrongfully accused of a gang-related murder in the ‘70s.
  • Co-directed by Julie Ha and Eugene Yi, “Free Chol Soo Lee” will feature firsthand interviews with activists and archival footage to capture Lee’s legacy around five decades after the event that united Asian Americans to free an innocent man.
  • “[K.W. Lee’s] series of stories helped trigger a landmark movement to free a wrongfully convicted man from death row,” Ha told IndieWire. “You pay attention, and it actually changes your whole world view and what might be your purpose in life. We just decided to dig in and excavate the story because we just knew it was too important not to be known.”
  • “Free Chol Soo Lee” will premiere at the IFC Center in New York City on Aug. 12, and a one-night-only simulcast screening event is also being planned by MUBI in more than 180 locations across the country during what would have been the week of Lee’s 70th birthday.
  • The Sundance documentary will start premiering in theaters on Aug. 19.

A trailer released on Wednesday for the upcoming Sundance documentary “Free Chol Soo Lee” investigates the racial profiling of Chol Soo Lee, a Korean American death row inmate wrongfully accused of a gang-related murder in the ‘70s.

The documentary will dive into Lee’s case after he was arrested and convicted of killing Yip Yee Tak in San Francisco’s Chinatown in 1973, according to IndieWire.

NYT food writer Eric Kim’s new cookbook ‘Korean American’ will make you cry (and not from onions)

eric kim korean american FI
  • New York Times columnist Eric Kim sat with NextShark to talk about his bestselling debut cookbook, “Korean American.”
  • The book not only includes delicious, original recipes, but an investigation into Asian American identity and culture.
  • “Only recently have I been able to fully embrace that I am at once both and neither, and something else entirely: I am Korean American,” explains Kim.
  • The book is full of mesmerizing, mouth-watering photos of Kim’s many brilliant dishes, but as Kim also says, this was a project of unpacking his upbringing, as Jean’s son and as a Korean American existing in a space between two worlds.
  • His recipes magnify this point, with many being a fusion of Korean and American cuisine, such as his pan-seared rib eye with gochujang (red pepper paste) butter dish or his sesame-soy deviled eggs.

New York Times columnist Eric Kim sat with NextShark to talk about his bestselling debut cookbook, “Korean American,” which not only includes delicious, original recipes, but an investigation into Asian American identity and culture.

Kim released the book at the end of March this year and has since been on tour, including a visit to his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia.

Iris Shim’s horror flick ‘Umma’ is a love letter to her mom

Sandra Oh in Iris Shim's "Umma"
  • Just in time for Women’s History Month, Sandra Oh transforms into yet another supernatural creature in a heartfelt effort to humanize Asian moms on the silver screen.
  • “Umma” is writer-director Iris Shim’s feature debut, starring Oh as a beekeeper whose quaint life with her daughter (Fivel Stewart) is interrupted by the death of her mom. 
  • Shim and Stewart sat down with NextShark to talk about the film’s use of horror genre elements and its distinctly Korean American feel to shed an empathetic light on mother-daughter relationships and the universal fear of turning into our parents.

This Women’s History Month, Sandra Oh transforms into not one but two supernatural creatures in an effort to humanize Asian moms on the silver screen, showing us there is room for nuance amid Hollywood’s growing interest in Asian American stories.

“Umma” is writer-director Iris Shim’s feature debut, starring Oh as Amanda, a beekeeper whose quaint American farm life with her daughter Chris (Fivel Stewart) is interrupted by the death of her mom (MeeWha Alana Lee), or umma. While grappling with both the loss of her estranged, abusive mother from South Korea and Chris’ growing interest in leaving home for college, Amanda becomes haunted by the fear that she herself is becoming her umma.

Lunar New Years past and present: how rice cake soup cured my holiday dread

Korean Lunar New Year Seollal Tteokguk

Heading into the first couple months of the new year, all holiday-induced stress and winter sales jingles begin to wind down. Any empty hype around self-deluding resolutions makes way for the work we decide matters enough to us to actually do it. And the peppermint-infused holiday spirit dissipates into the gray mornings of January. Until the first new moon when local Asian markets suddenly get a bit busier.

Lunar New Years of the past

‘I hated life’: Chloe Kim threw her gold medal in the trash while in a ‘dark place’ after Pyeongchang Olympics

Chloe Kim hated life
  • Chloe Kim, 21, revealed she “hated life” months after she rose to fame following her gold medal win at the 2018 Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea.
  • “Everyone was like, ‘I just met her, and she’s such a b*tch.’ I’m not a b*tch. I just had the most exhausting two months of my life, and the minute I get home I’m getting hassled,” she told Time.

Korean American snowboarder Chloe Kim recently revealed what life was like after the 2018 Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, mentioning that she “hated life” and was never left alone following her success.

Speaking to Time, Kim, 21, admitted she had trouble coping with her newfound fame after becoming the youngest female athlete to win a gold medal in the halfpipe at the 2018 Winter Games.

‘Why do we have to fit in one box?’: Chef Roy Choi on activism, representation and the best bubble tea in LA

Roy Choi Broken Bread
  • Acclaimed Korean American chef Roy Choi spoke to NextShark about his brand of activism, his emphasis on truth-telling, and why he has “never given a f*ck” about what other Asians think of him.
  • Choi’s Emmy and James Beard-winning show “Broken Bread” returns for Season 2 on January 25 on Tastemade and KCET.

Ahead of the Season 2 premiere of his show “Broken Bread,” celebrity chef Roy Choi spoke to NextShark about his brand of activism, the pressures of representation and his journey pushing back against a single narrative.

Broken Bread Season 2

‘Dreams as boundless as their potential’: Remembering the first Korean immigrants to arrive in the US

  • The U.S. celebrates Korean American Day every year on Jan. 13.
  • The first large group of Korean immigrants arrived in Honolulu on Jan. 13, 1903, but succeeding immigration was hampered by racist U.S. policies until 1965.
  • President Joe Biden recently recognized Korean Americans for their contributions in all aspects of American society despite the discrimination they face amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

On this day in 1903, the first wave of Korean immigrants landed on U.S. soil. Aboard the RMS Gaelic, 102 passengers arrived on the shores of Honolulu in search of greener pastures.

That fateful day would herald a century of immigration and diplomatic relations between the U.S. and South Korea. It would also be recognized as Korean American Day, which commemorates the contributions of Korean Americans in all aspects of American life.