Browsing Tag

high school

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New York state Sen. John Liu pushes for return to merit-based high school admissions

  • Sen. John C. Liu (NY-D) sent a letter to New York City’s Department of Education (DOE) Chancellor David Banks on Friday requesting to remove the high school lottery admissions process from the city's public high school system.
  • “The high school admissions process has been rife with uncertainty and confusion under the current system causing outrage during an already stressful time in families’ lives,” Liu said in a press release on Monday.
  • “The DOE must abandon this lottery as a relic of the pandemic, and reinstate an admissions system that values diligence and achievement,” he continued.
  • Liu noted in his letter to Banks that the uncertainty ingrained in the lottery-based admission process has driven many families out of the public school system, with some even opting to move out of New York.

Sen. John C. Liu (NY-D) has called on New York City’s Department of Education (DOE) to remove the city’s high school lottery-based admissions process and return to a system that “values diligence and achievement.”

In his letter addressed to DOE Chancellor David Banks on Friday, Liu requested that the DOE return to its previous admissions process that considered academic performance for students, calling the current lottery-based process “unpopular and ineffective.”

NYC admission lottery system sees Asian students less likely to land in their desired high schools than their counterparts: report

  • In a new lottery-style admission system, Asian students are 20 percent less likely to be admitted into one of their top fiveNew York City school choices as compared to their Black and Latinx student counterparts.
  • According to the New York City school admission results released by the Department of Education, among the 12,082 Asian students applying for first-year seats in city schools for the Fall of 2022, only 8,484 secured a selection from one of their top five choices.
  • Seventy percent of Asian applicants received placement in one of their top five choices, as compared to 90% of Black applicants and 89% of Latinx ones.
  • If the summary results are narrowed down to top three choices, 58% of Asian students received admittance from one of their top three choices, while 82% of Black and 80% of Latinx students received the same.
  • The issue of equity has lawmakers and community leaders divided, with many Asian American families vocalizing their frustrations at a system that they allege heavily disadvantages them in the application process.

In a new lottery-style admission system, Asian students are 20 percent less likely to be admitted into one of their top five New York City high school choices as compared to their Black and Latinx student counterparts.

According to the New York City school admission results released by the Department of Education, among the 12,082 Asian students applying for first-year seats in public city high schools for the Fall of 2022, only 8,484 secured a selection from one of their top five choices. 

Wisconsin school district rejects award-winning novel about Japanese internment for being ‘diverse’

  • The Muskego-Norway School Board rejected the use of “When the Emperor Was Divine,” a book recommended by the district’s curriculum committee for a 10th-grade accelerated English class.
  • The district’s curriculum committee had previously endorsed the 2002 novel by author Julie Otsuka about the incarceration of a Japanese American family during World War II.
  • Parents who attended the meeting stated that board member Laurie Kontney said the book was selected for being a “diverse” book.
  • Other board members told a parent that the book would create a problem with “balance,” partly because a 10-page excerpt from a nonfiction book about the concentration camps is already included in the class curriculum.
  • In a letter to the Muskego-Norway School Board, Japanese American Citizens League Executive Director David Inoue, wrote: “The call for a ‘balanced’ viewpoint in the context of the incarceration of Japanese Americans is deeply problematic, and racist, and plays into the same fallacies the United States Army used to justify the incarceration.”

Board members of a school district in southeastern Wisconsin rejected the use of “When the Emperor Was Divine,” a novel about Japanese American incarceration during World War II, for a high school class. 

The Muskego-Norway school district’s curriculum committee had previously endorsed the 2002 novel by author Julie Otsuka for use in a 10th-grade accelerated English class. 

40 Japanese Americans interned while students during WWII receive high school diplomas 80 years later

world war ii
  • Forty Japanese American students who were denied their chance to graduate during World War II finally received their diplomas from Mt. Diablo High School in Concord, California.
  • In 1942, Japanese American students in California were forced to drop out of school as they joined their families inside the Japanese concentration camps.
  • Students in the history and ethnic studies class in Mt. Diablo High School lobbied the district to award the belated diplomas to the interned students.
  • On May 24, the interned students joined Mt. Diablo High School's Class of 2022 as honorary members and were ceremoniously granted their diplomas.

After 80 long years, 40 Japanese Americans who were denied their chance to graduate high school during World War II finally got their diplomas.

In 1942, Japanese American students in California were forced to drop out of school as they joined their families inside the concentration camps set up for all people of Japanese descent.

Malaysian girl taken to ICU after being forced to run 30 laps at school as punishment

Malaysian girl running punishment ICU
  • A Malaysian teenager was admitted to an intensive care unit after she was subjected to running 30 laps at school as part of a class punishment.
  • On May 11, a physical education teacher at the Foon Yew High School in Kulai, Johor, in Malaysia punished an entire class for not completing their homework by forcing the students to run around a volleyball court 30 times with their masks on.
  • The girl, 15, purportedly began to feel ill after the 15th lap and was allowed to walk for the remaining laps. After she got home, her heart began to beat rapidly and she went into shock with a heart rate of 200 beats per minute.
  • The girl’s mother wrote about the incident on Facebook, where she detailed how the school had brushed it off and told her that the “issue had been settled.”
  • After posting on Facebook, the girl’s parents received a formal apology from the principal and teacher involved and stated that they would not be pursuing an investigation.

A Malaysian teenager was reportedly rushed to an intensive care unit after being forced to run 30 laps around a volleyball court as a class punishment for not finishing assigned homework.

On May 11 at the Foon Yew High School in Kulai, Johor, in Malaysia, a physical education teacher punished an entire class by forcing them to run around a volleyball court 30 times for not completing their homework. All of the students were also required to keep their masks on while running.

10th grader invents low-cost prosthetic arm that can be controlled by the mind

  • Virginia senior Benjamin Choi, 17, has invented an affordable, mind-controlled prosthetic arm that costs only $300 to create.
  • Choi first designed the prosthetic as a 10th-grader in the summer of 2020, when COVID-19 barred him from leaving home.
  • After over 75 iterations, the robotic arm is now made with engineering-grade materials and run by artificial intelligence that interprets brain waves with 95% accuracy.
  • The invention has brought Choi multiple awards, funding and two provisional patents before he enters college.
  • Choi is also his school’s student body president, a nationally-ranked squash player and a competitive violinist.

A 17-year-old in Virginia is making headlines for creating an affordable prosthetic arm that can be controlled by the mind.

Benjamin Choi, now a senior at Potomac High School, developed the first version of the robotic arm in 2020 using his sister’s $75 3D printer and some fishing line.

Girl, 14, beaten unconscious by older male student in Canada after he made anti-Asian, homophobic remarks

Teen Attacked British Columbia
  • Janice Xie, a 14-year-old Canadian high school student, suffered head injuries that left her unconscious after an alleged unprovoked attack by a 17-year-old male student in the city of Richmond.
  • "He called me a homophobic slur. He called me the 'F' slur and said all Asians are ugly and that he hates all Asians," Xie said.
  • The male student, whose identity was withheld in accordance with the Youth Criminal Justice Act, was apprehended at the scene and released to a legal guardian.
  • Tim Sorensen, the victim's father, said local authorities informed him that the alleged attacker would be formally charged with assault.
  • The incident is currently under investigation by the local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in Richmond.

Local authorities in Canada are investigating an attack that left a 14-year-old student unconscious inside a high school in the city of Richmond.

Janice Xie, a Grade 9 student at Hugh Boyd Secondary School, said a 17-year-old Grade 11 student beat her up in a school corridor and left her with head injuries on Thursday.

Students will play video games as part of their curriculum at Japan’s first esports high school

Japan is taking the next step in esports development by opening the country’s first esports high school.

The school, Esports Koutou Gakuin, will most likely open in April, according to Kotaku. It will be funded by the esports divisions of Japanese telecom company NTT and pro soccer team Tokyo Verdy. It’s also being staffed by professional esports players as well as managers from those companies. So if you want to start playing now, you can go to sites like https://w88kpi.com.

Salutatorian Faces Racist Bullying After Applauding ‘Middle Eastern Peers’ in Speech

Davie

A young Asian American woman in Davie, Fla., has become the target of racist cyberbullying after she applauded “Middle Eastern peers” for making it through high school in her graduation speech.

What she said: Rachel Cheng, this year’s salutatorian of Western High School, used her time on stage on June 8 to address the struggles faced by Asian Americans and other minorities to get to graduation.

SF’s Top Public High School Drops Good Grades for Admissions, Will Now Use Lottery

Lowell High School, regarded as San Francisco’s top public high school, will no longer consider academic achievement in its admission process.

The San Francisco Board of Education voted 5-2 in favor of a random lottery system on Tuesday night, halting the school’s century-long practice of administering entrance tests and evaluating scholastic records.