William Yuk

William Yuk

29 posts

South Korean piano prodigy Yunchan Lim becomes youngest ever to conquer prestigious Van Cliburn

  • South Korea’s Yunchan Lim made history after becoming the youngest pianist to win the world-renowned Van Cliburn International Piano Competition over the weekend.
  • Named after the famed pianist, the quadrennial competition attracts several of the world’s most talented young pianists as it supports rising artists and brings their performances to the masses.
  • While Lim performed an expansive repertoire of pieces, his most groundbreaking performance was a riveting rendition of Rachmaninov’s “Piano Concerto No. 3,” which moved the piece’s legendary conductor Marin Alsop to tears.
  • Despite distinguishing himself as one of the brightest young luminaries in the classical world, Lim was humbled by the experience.
  • “I am still a student,” Lim told Fort Worth Magazine. “I feel like I learn a lot still. It’s a great competition and I feel the burden of receiving this great and honorable award. I will push myself to measure myself up to the honor I received today.”

South Korea’s Yunchan Lim made history after becoming the youngest pianist to win the world-renowned Van Cliburn International Piano Competition over the weekend. 

Named after the famed pianist, the competition is held quadrennially in Fort Worth, Texas, attracting many of the world’s most talented young pianists as it supports rising artists and brings their performances to the masses.

Jeremy Lin opens basketball school in Toronto to empower Asian youth

  • Taiwanese American basketball player Jeremy Lin announced that he will open a school for aspiring basketball players of Asian descent in Toronto, where he won the 2019 NBA championship with the Raptors.
  • While Lin encountered racial prejudice throughout his basketball career, he hopes to inspire the next generation of Asian ballers to embrace their identities.
  • “I’m passionate about players becoming better at basketball but I’m also probably even more passionate about Asian American kids growing up with confidence, with self-esteem, being proud to be Asian, which was something that I wasn’t growing up,” Lin told The Raptors Show.
  • The basketball school’s program, which was developed in consultation with Lin, centers around a curriculum that incorporates physical and nonphysical activities to teach key elements of the sport, including communication and teamwork.
  • While Lin regrets not using the platform he gained after sparking the cultural phenomenon known as “Linsanity,” he is now making more of a commitment to help the Asian diaspora.

Taiwanese American basketball player Jeremy Lin announced that he will open a school for aspiring basketball players of Asian descent in Toronto, where he won the 2019 NBA championship with the Raptors.

The prejudice that Lin faced throughout the early stages of his career, from racially charged insults during his college days at Harvard to microaggressions from scouts who overlooked his athleticism during his NBA draft process, put a strain on his relationship with his Asian heritage.

How a Buddhist monk won one of the cooking world’s most prestigious awards without a restaurant or customers

Monk Chef
  • Jeong Kwan, this year’s recipient of Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants Icon Award, has captivated the culinary world without a single Michelin star, restaurant or customer to her name.
  • At the age of 17, Kwan went to a temple and began her path to monkhood. There, she mastered the art of temple cuisine: a style of cooking that prioritizes preserving the purity of every dish’s ingredients.
  • She eventually became an accidental but highly respected chef, garnering praise from culinary giants such as Éric Ripert and René Redzepi.
  • For Kwan, cooking is not a means to fame and fortune – it is a spiritual medium.
  • She hopes her award would “raise awareness of temple food and further advance Korean cuisine around the world.”

Jeong Kwan, this year’s recipient of Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants Icon Award, has captivated the culinary world without a single Michelin star, restaurant or customer to her name. 

Following her mother’s death, Kwan went to a temple at the age of 17 and began her path to monkhood. In her new home, she mastered the art of temple cuisine: a style of cooking that prioritizes preserving the purity of every dish’s ingredients.

Beabadoobee’s latest song release ’10:36′ is a grungy ode to late-night cuddles

  • Beabadoobee released “10:36,” the fourth single for her upcoming album “Beatopia,” on Wednesday.
  • The song marks a departure from the glittery and polished pop-rock vibes of her 2020 debut but retains the pervading sense of warmth that Beabadoobee’s music is known for.
  • In a press release, Beabadoobee revealed that the song’s title is a reference to the time it was when she had finished writing it, and that its lyrics are based on her “weird dependency on human contact to sleep.”
  • Beabadoobee’s sophomore album is slated to release on July 15, 2022.

Filipino British singer-songwriter Beabadoobee released “10:36,” the fourth single for her upcoming album “Beatopia,” on Wednesday.

The song marks a departure from the glittery and polished pop-rock vibes of her 2020 debut, “Fake it Flowers,” opting for a more rustic and stripped-down sound employing a fuzzy orchestration of drums and acoustics. Yet, her soft and delicate vocals provide the comforting sense of warmth that fans have come to expect from a Beabadoobee track. 

Rina Sawayama fearlessly line dances down the aisle in new music video for her single ‘This Hell’

  • Japanese British artist Rina Sawayama is accompanied by an entourage of cowboy hat-wearing dancers at a Western-themed wedding celebration and afterparty in the new music video for her single "This Hell."  
  • First unveiled last month, “This Hell” is the lead single off of Sawayama’s sophomore album “Hold That Girl,” which releases on Sept 2.

Japanese British artist Rina Sawayama is accompanied by an entourage of cowboy hat-wearing dancers at a Western-themed wedding celebration and afterparty in the new Ali Kurr-directed music video for her single “This Hell.”  

First unveiled last month, “This Hell” is the lead single off of Sawayama’s sophomore album “Hold That Girl,” which releases on Sept 2. The glitzy blend of pop and country proudly celebrates communal expression and defiance in the face of oppression. The music video dropped on Wednesday.

Trailer: Visionary director Masaaki Yuasa’s ‘Inu-Oh’ combines theatrics from two distant eras

  • The latest trailer for the upcoming Japanese animated film “Inu-Oh” showcases the vibrant world of visionary director Masaaki Yuasa’s “revisionist rock opera.”
  • Taking place during 14th century Japan, the film follows a pair of performers who band together to stage electrifying large-scale concerts.
  • The duo and their performances are inspired by a classical Japanese form of theater called Noh, which is famed for its subtlety and expressiveness.
  • The film was released in Japan on May 28 and will have a limited release in the U.S. on August 12.

The latest trailer of the upcoming Japanese animated film “Inu-Oh” showcases the vibrant world of visionary director Masaaki Yuasa’s “revisionist rock opera.”

Taking place during 14th century Japan, the film follows a pair of performers — Inu-Oh, a masked dancer who has been afflicted by an ancient curse, and Tomona, a blind musician haunted by his past — who band together to stage electrifying large-scale concerts. 

Newly uncovered artifacts reveal the secrets of a long-lost Chinese civilization

  • Archaeologists in southwest China have uncovered a trove of over 13,000 artifacts that shed light on the vibrant culture of Sanxingdui — an ancient Chinese civilization that mysteriously vanished thousands of years ago.
  • One of the highlights is a bronze and jade box with a tortoise-shaped lid adorned with handles in the shape of dragon heads.
  • "It would not be an exaggeration to say that the vessel is one of a kind, given its distinctive shape, fine craftsmanship and ingenious design,” Li Haichao, a professor at Sichuan University, told Xinhua.
  • Many of the sculptures uncovered are emblematic of cultural exchange and integration in the early Chinese civilization.
  • Discovered by a farmer in the Sichuan Province in 1927, the site was a shocking revelation for many historians and archeologists because it challenged the well-accepted theory that the birthplace of Chinese civilization was in northern China’s Yellow River Basin.
  • Because there are no existing written records or human remains attributed to Sanxingdui, the artifacts uncovered in the site are the sole remnants of a culture that experts believe to be a part of the 4800-year-old Shu Kingdom.

Archaeologists in southwest China announced on Mondy that they have uncovered a trove of over 13,000 artifacts that shed light on the vibrant culture of Sanxingdui — an ancient Chinese civilization that mysteriously vanished thousands of years ago.

One of the highlights is a bronze and jade box with a tortoise-shaped lid adorned with handles in the shape of dragon heads. Researchers also revealed that the box had been wrapped in silk after detecting traces of the material surrounding it. 

Live-action ‘One Punch Man’ film adaptation to be directed by Justin Lin of the ‘Fast & Furious’ franchise

one punch man
  • Everyone’s favorite bald-headed superhero will be punching his way onto the big screen in a live-action adaptation of “One Punch Man” helmed by “Fast & Furious” director Justin Lin.
  • Lin will be joined by veteran superhero movie producers Avi and Ari Anrad and script writers Scott Rosenberg and Jeff Pikner, who have previously worked on “Venom” and “Jumanji: The Next Level”.
  • “One Punch Man” tells the story of Saitama, a superhero with the overpowered ability to completely obliterate any opponent with a single punch, which is often played up for comedic effect.

Everyone’s favorite bald-headed superhero will be punching his way onto the big screen in a live-action adaptation of “One Punch Man” helmed by “Fast & Furious” director Justin Lin. 

After revitalizing the “Fast & Furious” franchise by directing highly successful installments that shifted the series’ trajectory from street racers to superspies, Lin recently left the ”Fast” family, exiting as director of “Fast X,” and will steer Sony’s film adaptation of the immensely popular web-comic, manga and anime series.

Michelle Yeoh says hot dog finger scene was ‘most beautiful love story’ in ‘Everything Everywhere All at Once’

  • In an interview with Variety, Michelle Yeoh shared her experiences with filming some of the most bizzare scenes in the wonderfully weird A24 film “Everything Everywhere All At Once.”
  • Daniel Kwan and Daniel Schienert (known collectively as the Daniels) managed to find ways to keep the action film veteran on her toes with raunchy setpieces.
  • “[The Daniels] are really going to fling around dildos in a fight. Going into it, I couldn’t imagine it, but I believed in them and I trusted them,” Yeoh told Variety.
  • However, the scene that left the actors with the most bruises was also the film’s most intimate — the hotdog fingers make-out session between alternate universe variants of Yeoh and Jamie Lee Curtis’ characters.
  • The scene was meant to provide a flourish of love and affection in what Yeoh describes as “the most beautiful love story in that universe.”

Michelle Yeoh has shared what it was like to film some of the most bizarre scenes in the wonderfully weird A24 film “Everything Everywhere All at Once.”

Even with Yeoh’s extensive experience with action-packed films, from playing a Bond Girl to starring in many of the most iconic martial arts films, the directing duo behind “Everything Everywhere All at Once” managed to keep her on her toes on set. Daniel Kwan and Daniel Schienert (known collectively as the Daniels) would bring in unapologetically raunchy set pieces, she revealed in an interview with Variety.

Sidhu Moose Wala: From TikTok to Times Square, fans pay tribute to late Indian rapper

  • Fans from around the world are honoring the life, music and legacy of Sidhu Moose Wala, who died on May 29.
  • Seoul-based Instagram user Jongsoo Lee posted a viral cover of the late rapper’s song “295.” which has racked up over 40,000 likes.
  • Billboards of New York City’s Times Square played clips of Sidhu Moose Wala’s music on June 11 — what would have been his 29th birthday — to a chorus of fans rapping along and holding up their phone camera flashlights in solidarity.
  • Fellow hip-hop artists have taken to social media to pay tribute to the rapper, including Drake, who posted a picture of Sidhu Moose Wala on his Instagram story captioned “RIP Moose.”

Fans from around the world are honoring the life, music and legacy of Sidhu Moose Wala, who died on May 29.

Seoul-based Instagram user Jongsoo Lee posted a viral cover of the late rapper’s song “295” on a joint account he shares with his wife, @mylovefromkorea17. The cover has racked up over 40,000 likes, and many fans have praised Jongsoo for his flawless pronunciation of the song’s Hindi lyrics.