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education

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Chinese universities among world’s top schools in producing ultra-rich graduates

chinese universities richest alumni
  • Chinese universities, including Peking University and Tsinghua University, are among the top universities to produce the most “ultra-wealthy” alumni, according to Altrata.
  • Peking University, the alma mater of Baidu co-founder Robin Li, has produced about 1,101 ultra-high net-worth (UHNW) individuals, landing the school at No. 8 on the list.
  • Tsinghua University, the school from which Chinese President Xi Jinping graduated, churned out about 1,100 ultra-wealthy alumni, placing it at No. 9 on the list.
  • Altrata defined ultra wealthy as those with a net worth of $30 million.
  • Harvard University came in at No. 1 among U.S. universities, with 17,660 ultra wealthy graduates.

Chinese universities, including Peking University and Tsinghua University, are among the top universities to produce the most “ultra-wealthy” alumni, according to a recent report from data company Altrata.

Peking University, the alma mater of Baidu co-founder Robin Li, has produced about 1,101 ultra-high net-worth (UHNW) individuals, landing the school at No. 8 on the list. Forbes named the 53-year-old tech company founder the 45th richest person in China, with a net worth of about $7.7 billion.

SF school board admonishes commissioner Ann Hsu over ‘flat-out wrong and racist’ comments

  • San Francisco school board member Ann Hsu was formally admonished over her controversial comments about the challenges of educating marginalized students.
  • Responding to an SF Parent Action Coalition questionnaire, Hsu wrote that the biggest challenges for Black and brown students are “unstable family environments” and a “lack of parental encouragement to focus on learning.”
  • The response drew ire from advocates and organizations, including civil rights group National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), which condemned her comments and called for her resignation.
  • On Tuesday, the school board held a special meeting to address the issue, which resulted in the vote to officially admonish her.
  • "I said things that perpetuated harmful stereotypes," Hsu was quoted as saying during the meeting. "I made a mistake, and I'm deeply sorry."
  • Despite the controversy, Hsu gained supporters, including organizations such as the Chinese Parent Advisory Council, the Chinese American Democratic Club and AsianAmericanVoters.org.

Members of San Francisco’s school board unanimously voted to admonish commissioner Ann Hsu over her controversial comments about equitable education.

Last month, Hsu was criticized for her answers to a questionnaire from the SF Parent Action.

SF official calls for school board member’s resignation following ‘flat-out wrong and racist’ comments

  • San Francisco Board of Supervisors President Shamann Walton called for the resignation of board member Ann Hsu following her "flat-out wrong and racist" comments in a recent San Francisco Parent Action Coalition questionnaire.
  • “Yeah sure, thank you for the apology, but at the end of the day this is probably reflective of how a person really feels,” Walton said on Wednesday. “It’s disheartening that someone like that is in a position to make decisions for our children."
  • Hsu reportedly implied in one of her responses that "marginalized students especially in the Black and brown community" are not fully supported by their families.
  • “Unstable family environments caused by housing and food insecurity along with lack of parental encouragement to focus on learning cause children to not be able to focus on or value learning,” Hsu wrote.
  • She eventually apologized for her comments in a Twitter thread on Tuesday, explaining that she “made a mistake.”
  • Hsu was one of the three school board members sworn in by Mayor London Breed in March to replace recalled members following a special election in February.

A top San Francisco official is calling for the resignation of school board member Ann Hsu following her controversial comments that “perpetuate harmful stereotypes on Black and Brown students and their families.”

In a statement on Wednesday, Board of Supervisors President Shamann Walton called for Hsu’s resignation, describing what happened as “disheartening.”

Doctor of weed? Thailand now offering cannabis science degrees after marijuana legalization

  • Waldo 18, a medicinal cannabis supply chain company in Thailand, is partnering with Filipino-Thai restaurant Toto Inasal to give individuals an opportunity to obtain a degree in cannabis science.
  • The Waldo Institute of Petchburi, officially accredited by Thailand’s Office of Higher Education Commission, will offer bachelors, masters and PhDs in Cannabis Science.
  • Hemp and cannabis were officially decriminalized in Thailand on June 9.

With Thailand’s decriminalization of cannabis on June 9, a company that distributes medicinal plants is offering degrees in cannabis science.

Waldo 18, a commercial supply chain company that grows and sells medicinal plants, is teaming up with Jongkasem Julakham-Platon, the owner of Filipino-Thai restaurant Toto Inasal in Bangkok, to provide cannabis science degrees at the Waldo Institute of Petchburi. The institution is accredited by Thailand’s Office of the Higher Education Commision, making the degree officially recognized. According to Julakhan-Platon, the institute will be offering bachelors, masters and PhDs in cannabis science.

New York City schools to launch new curriculum celebrating AAPI history this fall

  • New York City Mayor Eric Adams announced on Thursday that the city’s Department of Education (DOE) would be introducing a pilot curriculum that will teach students about the history and culture of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI).
  • The new curriculum, “Hidden Voices: Asian American and Pacific Islanders in the United States,” is planned for implementation next school year in the fall.
  • The program is part of the DOE’s Hidden Voices Project, a collaborative effort between the DOE’s Social Studies Department and the Museum of the City of New York.
  • Schools Chancellor David Banks explained that the pilot curriculum would cover stories from historical AAPI figures and also help battle anti-Asian hate crimes in the city, which saw a 361% increase in 2021 compared to the previous year.
  • While Banks has yet to announce the specific schools where the pilot program would be introduced, he said it will be developed for all grade levels across all New York City public schools by fall of 2024.

New York City public schools will introduce a new curriculum teaching students about the history and culture of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) starting next school year.

The new curriculum, “Hidden Voices: Asian American and Pacific Islanders in the United States,” aims to help students relate to each other amid the rising Asian American violence in the city brought by the COVID-19 pandemic, Mayor Eric Adams announced on Thursday.

‘God has not blessed us’: Indian boy’s response to a reporter about schools over temples goes viral

boyvsreporter
  • A boy in India has earned praise online for his candid response to a local reporter asking why he valued attending school over temple.
  • The 13-year-old boy from the city of Varanasi spoke about the merits of schools, noting, “When we study, then we’ll get a job.”
  • When the reporter prodded, the boy reasoned, “God has not blessed us. God will not give us anything. But education will.”
  • A video of the interview has been widely shared across social media platforms and has earned the boy praise online for his response.

A video of a teenage boy in India telling a reporter why classrooms are more important than temples has garnered attention online.

The clip, which has gone viral on social media, shows a local reporter from SM News interviewing a 13-year-old boy from Varanasi city, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

Top high school in US discriminated against Asian American applicants, judge rules

fairfax county
  • Judge Claude Hilton ruled Friday that Fairfax County public schools discriminated against Asian students applying to the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Fairfax County, Virginia.
  • The Coalition for TJ, led by students’ parents and represented by the Pacific Legal Defense Foundation, filed a lawsuit against the school in early January for discriminating against Asian students in the admission process.
  • The percentage of Asian students at the school dropped from 73% to 54% after revised admission policies were implemented to balance out racial representation at the school.
  • One of the rules in the revised admission policies included a “bonus system” which granted student applicants points for “experience factors,” including having previously attended underrepresented schools.

A federal judge ruled on Friday in favor of a parent coalition accusing Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology (TJHSST) in a lawsuit of discrimination against Asian American applicants through its revised admission policy.

STEM-focused TJHSST, located in Fairfax County, Virginia, is currently ranked as the No. 1 high school and No. 5 among STEM high schools in the country by U.S. News & World Report.

Women beat men in passing medical school entrance exams in Japan for first time, study finds

Doctor Health Worker Stethoscope Hospital Nurse
  • The number of women who passed their medical school entrance exams in Japan reportedly surpassed that of men for the 2021 academic year – a first in the country’s history, according to new data released by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology last week.
  • Out of 43,243 female applicants, 5,880 (13.60%) passed their exams while 8,421 out of 62,325 male applicants (13.51%) passed theirs.
  • The survey, released on Feb. 16, looked at male and female students at 81 of Japan’s universities with medical faculties.

New data released by Japan’s education ministry last week revealed that, for the first time in the country, the medical school entrance exam passing rate for women surpassed that of men.

The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology checked the entry exam passing rate of students across Japan’s 81 universities with medical faculties to find that the ratio of women who had passed their exams exceeded the ratio of men who passed theirs by 0.09%, The Asahi Shimbun reported.

San Francisco ousts 3 school board members over ‘anti-Asian’ policies

san francisco school board
  • Three members of the San Francisco School Board were removed from office after a recall election on Tuesday.
  • Demands for a recall sprang in early 2021 after the board pushed to rename 44 schools instead of working to get children back into classrooms.
  • The ousted members also voted on using a lottery system at Lowell High School, ending a century-long process of merit-based admissions that has kept its student population predominantly Asian.
  • Mayor London Breed, the top figure who supported the recall, said the results deliver a clear message that the board “must focus on the essentials of delivering a well-run school system above all else.”

Three members of San Francisco’s Board of Education were removed from office after a landslide vote in a recall election held on Tuesday.

The result brings a sense of relief for activists who have pushed for the members’ recall over misplaced priorities, including what many perceived to be “anti-Asian” policies.

‘Extremely not correct’: Chinese alphabet printout purportedly given to third graders goes viral

Incorrect Chinese Alphabet
  • A viral tweet posted by a parent in Irvine, California, shared an alleged printout their third-grade child brought home from school showing a false “Chinese alphabet.”
  • The sheet matched Chinese Hanzi characters with Roman letters, seemingly vaguely correlated by the shape of the characters and letters.
  • “I had to gently explain to him that this was, uh…extremely Not Correct,” the tweet author wrote

A tweet shared by an Irvine, California, parent shows an alleged printout their third grader brought home that incorrectly matched Roman letters to Hanzi characters labeled as the “Chinese alphabet.” 

Twitter user Foz Meadows posted the tweet on Tuesday, also Lunar New Year. A photo of the handout was attached. 

New Jersey becomes second state to require AAPI history be taught in schools

New Jersey AAPI History Edu Bill
  • Gov. Phil Murphy (D-N.J.) signed a new bill on Tuesday that requires K-12 schools in New Jersey to teach Asian American and Pacific Islander history as part of their curricula.
  • The recent move made New Jersey the second state to pass this type of bill after Illinois in July 2021.

New Jersey has become the second state that will require K-12 schools to teach Asian American and Pacific Islander history as part of their curricula starting in the 2022-2023 school year.

The bill, also known as the NJ AAPI Curriculum Bill (S4021/A6100), aims to create a “more tolerant and knowledgeable future for New Jersey,” Gov. Phil Murphy (D-N.J.) said after signing the legislation on Tuesday.