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jewish

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Asians, Jews in Philadelphia unite in new organization to fight hate

  • Gov. Tom Wolf’s Advisory Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs and the American Jewish Alliance launched the Pennsylvania Asian Pacific American Jewish Alliance (PAPAJA) on Thursday.
  • United by shared experiences of increased violence in recent years, the alliance seeks to build ties between the Asian and Jewish communities and create opportunities for them to work together against hate and discrimination.
  • Aside from combating hate, Stephanie Sun, executive director of the Advisory Commission, said the alliance will cultivate knowledge on unique common struggles, such as “the myth of model minority and the myth of dual loyalty.”
  • Thursday’s press conference, which was held at the Weitzman National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia, came right after the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah.

United by a common struggle of increased hate in recent years, Asian and Jewish people in Philadelphia will now be represented by an organization that aims to combat further violence against their communities.

Launched on Thursday by Gov. Tom Wolf’s Advisory Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs and the American Jewish Committee, the new Pennsylvania Asian Pacific American Jewish Alliance (PAPAJA) seeks to build ties between the Asian and Jewish communities and create opportunities to work together to purge anti-Asian hate and anti-Semitism.

‘You don’t want to take my money, do you?’: Mandarin-speaking rabbi fights antisemitism on China’s TikTok

  • American Rabbi Matt Trusch, who lived and worked in China for over a decade, is now fighting antisemitism by posting educational videos on his popular Douyin account.
  • In his Douyin bio, Trusch describes himself as a rabbi who shares “wisdom of the Talmud,” “interesting facts about the Jewish people,” “business thought” and “money-making tips.”
  • Trusch, who works with an Australia-based Chinese-speaking Jewish partner on creating content, shared that he intentionally included Chinese people's stereotypes about Jewish people in his bio to attract and reach more Chinese viewers.
  • Many of his viewers perceive the Talmud as a get-rich scheme rather than a Jewish religious text, a belief so popular in China that it has created an industry of self-help books and private schools that claim to teach about Jewish money-making secrets.
  • One of Trusch's videos in which he explains how China helped Jewish refugees fleeing from Europe during World War II received comments such as “You don’t want to take my money, do you?” and “Wall Street elites are all Jews.”
  • According to Trusch, the Chinese people’s view of the Talmud as a business guide also helps them navigate China’s complicated religious environment, where Judaism is not among the five recognized religions.

An American rabbi who lived and worked in China for over a decade is fighting antisemitism on Chinese social media using educational videos.

Rabbi Matt Trusch was sharing Jewish parables in fluent Mandarin on Douyin (China’s version of TikTok) from his Texas home last year when he came across users spouting Jewish stereotypes online.

Meet the Chinese Man Who Saved Over 5,000 Jews During the Holocaust

In an act of heroism that barely made it to history textbooks, one Chinese man had been responsible for saving thousands of Jewish people in World War II by welcoming them to Shanghai.

While others refused such action over fear of the Nazis, Ho Feng Shan, consul-general of then-Nationalist China’s Embassy in Vienna, defied his superiors’ orders and granted at least 5,000 visas to desperate Jews.

Why Jewish People Eat Chinese Food on Christmas

Jewish Christmas

Feasting on Chinese food has become customary for a lot of Jewish people in America during Christmas, and many may still be wondering why.

Aside from the obvious points that Jews celebrate Hanukkah, not Christmas, that they don’t enjoy “Christmas Hams” because they can’t eat pork, and that Chinese restaurants are typically one of the only places open on Christmas day, there’s something more about the relationship between the two immigrant cultures that grew together over time, according to The Atlantic.