Browsing Tag

Asian American history

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Denver to formally apologize for anti-Chinese riot of 1880

denverriot_feature
  • Denver is set to formally apologize to early Chinese immigrants and their descendants on April 16 for the historic injustices they suffered during an anti-Chinese riot that happened on Oct. 31, 1880.
  • A dispute in downtown Denver in 1880 led to a group of white people attacking Chinese residents and the death of Chinese laundry worker, Look Young.
  • Colorado Asian Pacific United (CAPU) and the city have teamed up to organize the event, which will be held at the University of Colorado Denver’s Lawrence Street Center downtown.
  • The office of Mayor Michael Hancock said the event will “promote reconciliation, inclusivity and education around the history and culture of Asian American/Pacific Islander Coloradans.”
  • Denver will reportedly be the sixth city to formally apologize to the Chinese community and the first outside of California.

Denver is set to formally apologize to early Chinese immigrants and their descendants on April 16 for the historic injustices they suffered during the city’s first race riot 142 years ago.

Colorado Asian Pacific United (CAPU) and the city have teamed up to organize the event, which will be held at the University of Colorado Denver’s Lawrence Street Center downtown.

Bainbridge Island marks the 80th anniversary of Japanese American incarceration during WWII

Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial
  • March 30 marks 80 years since the unjust incarceration of around 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, following the attack on Pearl Harbor.
  • The forced evacuation of people from their homes and into concentration camps on the West Coast was brought about by President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066 issued on Feb. 19, 1942.
  • In remembrance of the history, the community on Bainbridge Island, which is known to have been the first designated exclusion area, hosted a ceremony at the Japanese Exclusion Memorial.
  • Organizers of the event wished for this year’s anniversary to center around healing and acknowledgement of the island’s history.

Today marks 80 years since the unjust incarceration of around 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, following the attack on Pearl Harbor. 

The forced evacuation of people from their homes and into concentration camps on the country’s West Coast was brought about by President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066, issued on Feb. 19, 1942. 

Teen gets children’s books about Japanese American incarceration into Seattle-area elementary schools

Books
  • Kai Vanderlip, a 17-year-old high school student from Redmond, Washington, organized a project to teach children about the incarceration of Japanese Americans brought about by President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066.
  • The order forced over 100,000 Japanese Americans into internment camps during World War II.
  • In remembrance of the 80th anniversary of the order, Vanderlip finalized a list of six children’s books and managed to secure funding from the Lake Washington Schools Foundation and the City of Kirkland to buy six books each for 33 elementary schools.
  • “I didn’t learn much about this in elementary school, it was all my own research. Especially in 2020, it seemed super relevant,” he told The Seattle Times. “They could speak out and grow up to be more knowledgeable individuals who can speak out against intolerance of all forms.”

A 17-year-old high school student organized for six children’s books about the history of Japanese American incarceration to be made available in 33 elementary schools in Washington.  

Kai Vanderlip, of Tesla STEM High School, developed his pandemic project, “The Day of Remembrance Japanese Incarceration Literature for Libraries,” to help teach children about the unjust incarceration of over 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II that was brought about by President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066.

President Biden signs bill designating former Japanese incarceration camp in Colorado as historic site

amache
  • President Biden signed a bill on Friday designating a former World War II Japanese incarceration camp as a national historic site in Colorado.
  • From 1942 to 1945, more than 10,000 people, most of whom were Japanese Americans, were kept in the incarceration camp known as “Camp Amache.”
  • Amache is managed by the nonprofit Amache Preservation Society and owned by the town of Granada.
  • The site includes a cemetery, monument, rebuilt structures and landscaping.

A former World War II Japanese incarceration camp in Colorado has been designated a historic site in a bill signed by President Biden on Friday.

The Amache National Historic Site Act helps “to preserve, protect, and interpret… resources associated with the incarceration of civilians of Japanese ancestry during World War II at Amache.” 

Wisconsin bills could make it the third state to require AAPI history be taught in public schools

Wisconsin Legislation Public School History Curriculum
  • Two Wisconsin bills would amend state law to include the history of Hmong and Asian Pacific Island Desi Americans to the public school curriculum.
  • If passed, Wisconsin will become the third state to require Asian American history to be taught in public schools, while New Jersey, following Illinois’ lead, became the second state to do so with the passing of the NJ AAPI Curriculum Bill on Tuesday.

A pair of Wisconsin bills could make it mandatory to include the history of Hmong and Asian Pacific Islander Desi Americans to the state public school curriculum.

Senate Bill 379 and Assembly Bill 381 would amend state law to require, “at all grade levels, an understanding of human relations, particularly with regard to American Indians, Black Americans and, Hispanics, Hmong Americans, and Asian Pacific Islander Desi Americans.”

In unsparing pursuit of Asian American identity: A review of Jay Caspian Kang’s ‘The Loneliest Americans’

Jay Casper Kang's "The Loneliest Americans"

In the “Loneliest Americans,” Jay Caspian Kang unpacks the history and impossibility of the “Asian American” identifier, arguing in favor of a deeper solidarity.

Jay Caspian Kang’s “The Loneliest Americans” sets out to deconstruct our understanding of the term “Asian American,” a project that feels at times throughout the book both deeply uncomfortable and potentially impossible. You can tell Kang is feeling it too: there’s an unease around the position Asian Americans occupy in American society, an apprehension around the absurdity of connecting so many diverse people under one identifier,  a concern about his own complicity in the structures he criticizes. 

The first Asian American settlement in the US is being washed away by climate change

St. Malo being destroyed

The Filipino American community are striving to preserve their history as the first permanent Filipino settlement in the U.S. is being washed away by climate change. 

Vanishing history: Due to the climate crisis, St. Malo, a former village along the shore of Lake Borgne in St. Bernard Parish, La., was battered from the sea-level rise of frequent hurricanes and erosion, reported CNN

Archaeologists unearth first-ever house for Chinese transcontinental railroad workers in the US

Chinese railroad workers

Archaeologists from the Utah State Historic Preservation Office have uncovered the first Chinese house for transcontinental railroad workers in the U.S. during an excavation of a ghost town in Terrace, Utah, last May.

The discovery: Preservation officer Chris Merritt led a team of archaeologists to conduct two excavations in September 2020 and May 2021, according to FOX13 Now.

‘Thank you for all you do’: Biden honors Fil-Am frontline workers to start Filipino American History Month

Filipino American History Month statement by Joe Biden

As October marks Filipino American History month, President Joe Biden expressed his gratitude to Filipino Americans for enriching and strengthening the U.S. over the years.

Biden’s statement: In a statement issued by the White House on Saturday, the president and the first lady recognized the contributions of Filipino Americans in the U.S. He honored the Filipino community for their sacrifices in armed services and in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic.

Meet the civil rights leader who became the first female Filipino American legislator in the US

Thelma Buchholdt legislator

Thelma Buchholdt was the first Philippine-born female legislator in the U.S. and was elected to serve in the Alaska House of Representatives for four terms from 1975 to 1982. 

Who was Buchholdt: Born in August 1934, in Claveria, Cagayan, she came to America in 1951 and graduated from Mount St. Mary’s College in Los Angeles and the University of Nevada in Las Vegas.

Illinois signs law that would make it first state to require Asian American history lessons

illinois

Illinois will make history as the first state to officially require Asian American history lessons in the public school curriculum.

Setting a new standard: On Friday, Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker signed the Teaching Equitable Asian American History Act (TEAACH Act), making it mandatory for public schools to include a unit studying the “events of Asian American history,” reported CNN.

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