Browsing Tag

national security law

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Hong Kong student sentenced to 5 years in jail for sending pro-independence messages on Telegram

  • Lui Sai-yu, a 25-year-old undergraduate student in Hong Kong, was charged with “incitement to secession” in April 2021 under the 2020 Beijing imposition of the national security law.
  • He was sentenced to 5 years in jail on Friday for advocating the city’s independence from the Chinese Communist Party in his messages sent on instant messaging app Telegram. 
  • Investigators found more than 1,000 offending messages sent by Liu that included statements such as “Liberate Hong Kong; revolution of our times,” “Hong Kong independence, the only way out” and “Fight against totalitarianism.”
  • Liu’s lawyer is considering an appeal, claiming that posting on Telegram differs from speaking in public.
  • The student is the fourth person to be jailed under the security law that criminalizes any acts of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign or external forces with up to life imprisonment.

An engineering student from Hong Kong has been sentenced to five years in jail  for advocating the city’s independence from the Chinese Communist Party in his messages sent on instant messaging app Telegram.

Lui Sai-yu, a 25-year-old undergraduate student at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, was charged with “incitement to secession” in April 2021 under the 2020 Beijing imposition of the national security law.

UK judges withdraw from top Hong Kong court in opposition to China’s security law

court of final appeal hong kong
  • The U.K.’s Foreign Office announced it was pulling its judges from Hong Kong’s top court, with two Supreme Court justices resigning immediately over growing concerns with China’s national security law passed in 2020.
  • Hong Kong’s Basic Law allows for top judges from overseas common law jurisdictions to sit as non-permanent members of the Court of Final Appeals.
  • The decision was supported by many government officials and Conservative lawmakers.
  • Addressing his resignation, U.K. Supreme Court President Robert Reed said, “The courts in Hong Kong continue to be internationally respected for their commitment to the rule of law, nevertheless, I have concluded, in agreement with the government, that the judges of the Supreme Court cannot continue to sit in Hong Kong without appearing to endorse an administration which has departed from values of political freedom, and freedom of expression.” 
  • China’s national security law gives China sweeping authority over matters of secession, subversion, terrorism and foreign collusion with swift legal enforcement frameworks, which has led to the arrests of pro-democracy activists and journalists.

The U.K.’s Foreign Office declared Wednesday it was pulling its judges from Hong Kong’s top court over concerns with China’s national security law.

Hong Kong’s Basic Law, a constitution upholding the “one country, two systems” principle, allows for senior judges from common law jurisdictions to sit as non-permanent members of their top court, the Hong Kong Court of Final Appeals.