Chinese Services Will Destroy Love Affairs and Get Rid of Mistresses For $45,000

Cheating husbands in China are probably aware by now that Chinese wives do not take infidelity lightly. While some wives take the matter into their own hands and openly attack mistresses violently in the city streets, there are those who choose to seek the help of professionals.

Agencies offering specialized services that end extramarital affairs between husbands and their mistresses have become increasingly popular in the country recently, The New York Times reports. The so-called “mistress-dispelling services,” which are usually sought by the cheated wife, not only provide necessary tips and coaching to save the marriages, but also work primarily to eliminate the mistress.

The job includes stealthily making a way into the mistress’s life in an effort to win her trust and eventually work into ending the affair.

While there are no official figures to indicate how widespread the use of “mistress-dispellers” is, pages of ads and blogs that link back to mistress-dispelling companies can easily be found online. Some of the firms are reportedly located in Shanghai and Guangzhou.

One such firm is Weiqing International Marriage Hospital Emotion Clinic Group. Operations began in 2001 in Shanghai, and has since expanded to as many as 59 cities.

Another mistress-dispelling company called The Reunion Company claimed to use ’emotional manipulation” to effectively recover the erring husband from the mistress.

“We want to disrupt conventional ways of thinking,” said Mr. Kang, the manager of The Reunion Company. “Chinese women think that if you treat men well, they’ll love you more. But often, we men love the people who hurt us the most.”

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The service, which generally has a base cost of 300,000 yuan, or about $45,000, covers expenses needed to successfully manipulate and drive away the mistresses. The operation usually takes about three months and has a reported success rate of 90%.

Each firm has its own process of removing mistresses from the family picture. Weiging director Shu Xin told the New York Times that their company begins by identifying and figuring out the type of mistress (for money/love/sex) the husband is in relationship with. It is only after then that they start to “draw up a plan.”

A scenario may lead into the “dispeller” to move near the mistress’s residence or to find ways in getting to know her. It is sometimes necessary to even get her a new lover, find a way to relocate her or simply convince her that the married man she is just a waste of time,

Weiqing, like the other agencies, said their “dispellers” are not allowed to be intimately involved with the mistresses or use any form of threat or violence.

China’s economic growth in the recent decades has also given rise in extramarital affairs among the country’s middle and upper class. Such scenario has created a business opportunity for some innovative entrepreneurs tap in and create an industry out of.

So far, the business has been doing well with Weiqing claiming to have serviced 10,000 clients this year, while the Reunion Company, reportedly entertains about 175 inquiries a day.

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