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Chinese American chef called a ‘communist’ after landing in top 3 in primary election

Dan Wu
  • An Asian American chef running for city council in Lexington, Kentucky, is speaking out against a campaign against his candidacy, which has called the new politician a “Communist.”
  • Dan Wu, 48, writes in an opinion piece in the Lexington Herald-Leader that two photos of him resurfaced on social media trying to accuse him of having ties with Communists.
  • The first photo was reportedly taken seven years ago at an army surplus store where he saw a Soviet flag in-person for the first time.
  • He says the second photo was taken nine years ago.
  • “I am not a communist, nor have I ever been a communist,” Wu wrote on Facebook.

A Chinese American chef running for city council in Lexington, Kentucky, is speaking out against a campaign against his candidacy, which has called the new politician a “communist.”

Dan Wu, 48, who finished second in the May primary, claims in an opinion piece in the Lexington Herald-Leader that two photos of him resurfaced on social media along with accusations he has communist ties.

AAPI voters are suing Texas for allegedly discriminatory gerrymandering

  • A coalition of AAPI voters is suing the state of Texas for allegedly discriminatory redistricting practices which suppress the voting power of minorities.
  • The plaintiffs’ legal team is composed of civil rights organizations and attorneys who believe that the state’s redistricting practices are “the most brazen, clear case of vote dilution"
  • While critics of the lawsuit claim it is “not mathematically geographically possible” to limit racial groups into select districts in a “diverse and spread out” state, voter advocacy groups argue that the goal of the suit is not about grouping ethnic groups together, but preventing them from being deliberately split apart.
  • Because the lawsuit is scheduled to go to trial at the end of September, its verdict will not arrive on time to impact midterm elections this fall.

A coalition of AAPI voters is suing the state of Texas for allegedly suppressing the voting power of minorities through last year’s redistricting. 

Amatullah Contractor, who is among the group of plaintiffs filing a lawsuit against Governor Greg Abbott and Secretary of State John Scott, was recently redistricted from her diverse and liberal-leaning 7th district to the more rural and conservative 8th district when Texas legislators redrew the maps last year.

Survey: Asian American approval of Biden plummets despite White House efforts

  • President Biden’s approval rating among Asian Americans have witnessed a major drop, plummeting from 72% to 44% in the past year.
  • In a poll conducted from June 27 to July 4 by the Pew Research Center, U.S. adults were asked whether they approve or disapprove of the President’s job performance.
  • Out of the Asian Americans surveyed, 55% in total responded that they disapprove: 25% responded “strongly disapprove” and 30% responded “somewhat disapprove.”
  • In contrast, 44% in total answered that they approve, with 15% responding “strongly approve” and 29% “somewhat approve.”
  • The Republican National Committee posted in a blog yesterday that “100 days from November’s midterm elections, AAPI voters are leaving the Democrat Party as they blame historic inflation, rising crime, aand discrimination in education on Joe Biden’s radical agenda.”

President Biden’s approval rating plummeted among Asian Americans 72% to 44% over the past year.

In a poll conducted from June 27 to July 4 by the Pew Research Center, U.S. adults were asked whether they approve or disapprove of the president’s job performance.

Burmese American journalist Alex Wagner to succeed Rachel Maddow on MSNBC prime time slot

  • MSNBC President Rashida Jones announced during several interviews with various media outlets on Monday that Burmese American journalist Alex Wagner will succeed Rachel Maddow during MSNBC’s prime-time slot at 9 p.m. for four days a week beginning on Aug. 16.
  • Wagner, 44, will host her own show from Tuesday to Friday, succeeding Maddow, 49, who announced in April that she would be scaling back her duties at MSNBC after signing a deal with NBCUniversal.
  • A graduate of Brown University in 1999, Wagner, who was initially an analyst for MSNBC, hosted “Now With Alex Wagner” at the network from 2011 until 2015, then joined “CBS This Morning Saturday” as a co-anchor in 2016.
  • MSNBC stated that Wagner will be the only Asian American host of a prime-time cable news channel program.
  • “I’m honored to be anchoring a key hour of television in such a critical time for American democracy,” Wagner told The Hollywood Reporter. “In many ways, the stakes have never been higher, and there’s no better place to explore this moment than MSNBC. I’m thrilled to be coming home."

Burmese American journalist Alex Wagner is set to become the only Asian American to host a prime-time cable news channel program starting on Aug. 6.

Wagner will succeed Rachel Maddow during MSNBC’s prime-time slot at 9 p.m. for four days a week.

Trump endorses Rep. Gosar a day after his censure over edited ‘Attack on Titan’ video of him killing AOC

Trump Gosar censured anime post

Former President Donald Trump has endorsed Rep. Paul Gosar (R-Ariz.) a day after the congressman was censured for posting an edited anime video that violently targeted Democratic leaders.

What happened: On Nov. 7, Gosar, who has served Arizona’s 4th District since 2013, posted an edited intro of the anime “Attack on Titan” which depicted him killing Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) and attacking President Joe Biden. This led to a censure resolution that essentially disables him from becoming a voice for his constituents at the House of Representatives.

OC Vietnamese Americans Rally to Fight Against Trump’s Deportation of War Refugees

More than 100 Vietnamese Americans took to the streets of Little Saigon in Orange County, California to protest the Trump administration’s move to deport thousands of war refugees.

After a meeting between U.S. and Vietnam representatives last week, over 8,000 Vietnamese residents who committed crimes in America will face deportation if immigration officials succeed in changing an agreement that protects their residency status.

Trump Mocks Japanese Reporter During Absolute Mess of a Press Conference

trump

President Donald Trump’s White House press conference on Wednesday after the 2018 midterm elections is rife with jaw-dropping moments including when he mocked a Japanese reporter. 

During the bizarre press conference-turned-tirade, Trump hurled insults at opponents, mocked losing candidates, snapped at the reporters and complained about several questions which he refused to respond to.

Young Kim Becomes First Korean-American Woman to Join U.S. House of Representatives

young kim

History was made yesterday during the U.S. 2018 midterms when Young Kim, former State Legislator, became the first Korean-American woman to join the U.S. House of Representatives as well as be the first Korean-American member to serve in Congress.

In a very close race in California’s 39th district with 51.4% of votes against her opponent, Kim defeated Democrat Gil Cisneros who holds 48.6%, according to Yonhap News.

AAPIs mark the largest increase among new immigrants in state legislatures since 2020, report finds

  • There are 27 newly-elected Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) in the 2022 legislative session, the largest gain among groups of first and second-generation U.S. immigrants since 2020.
  • The finding comes in a new report by New American Leaders, a nonpartisan nonprofit that empowers “New Americans” — which it defines as first and second-generation U.S. immigrants — to run for public office.
  • Speaking to NextShark, New American Leaders President Ghida Dagher attributed the AAPI community’s heightened political participation to the need to combat anti-Asian hate, which has progressively worsened amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Dagher said New Americans get involved in politics for the same reason any other American does: to see change in the policies affecting their communities.

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) saw the largest gains among first- and second-generation U.S. immigrants in state legislatures in 2022, a new report has found. 

Twenty-seven first- and second-generation AAPIs were newly elected to this year’s legislative session, bringing the total of AAPI lawmakers to 103. The group now composes 34.7% of the new immigrant-held legislative seats across the U.S.