Study cracks the code for the ‘ideal’ male butt

Study cracks the code for the ‘ideal’ male butt
via jessicakwok
Ryan General
December 25, 2023
Researchers from Duke University have purportedly determined what makes the “ideal” male buttocks. 
How they did it: Plastic surgery researchers polled 2,095 participants in the U.S. to form a scientific basis for discussions surrounding gluteal enhancement procedures. A third (33%) of the respondents were Asian Americans.
The participants were asked to rate digitally altered images of butts from various angles, determining preferences for stick-out, roundness and width. 
What they found: The results revealed a common preference for “moderately enhanced, well-proportioned” male buttocks, marking such tushes as the most aesthetically pleasing, according to lead author Dr. Ashit Patel.
“In our survey, raters thought the ideal male buttocks shouldn’t be flat, but also shouldn’t stick out too far,” Patel said in a press release. “The buttocks shouldn’t be too wide and should retain the characteristic dimple on the sides.” 
The ideal thigh-to-buttock ratio, which is measured in the middle of the butt and just below the thigh, was identified as 1.18. The ideal height-to-width ratio, and the angle between the crack and the edge in a three-quarter view, were determined to be 0.66 and 66 degrees, respectively.
Cultural nuances: The study also found that African Americans preferred a slightly fuller look, while Asian Americans favored a more toned one. 
Sexual orientation also played a role, with all groups favoring a more prominent shape, albeit with variations in preferred angles. Gender emerged as less of a factor, with non-binary individuals, men and women largely agreeing on what constitutes an appealing male buttock.
Cracking the code: Beyond aesthetics, the study sheds light on the role of preferences in gender-affirming surgery for both cis and trans men. Insights from the research could be used to guide plastic surgeons toward sculpting aesthetically pleasing masculine buttocks.
The study was published in the December 2023 issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.
 
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