NextSharkNextShark.com
Latest Newsletter🍵 Details from Half Moon BayRead

Article

Woman dubbed ‘new tank man’ for defiantly facing police during violent protest dispersal in China

  • A Chinese protestor who held her ground against riot police has earned the moniker “new tank man,” in reference to the defiant protester who faced a row of tanks during the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests.

  • Footage of the still-unidentified woman refusing to move as she films troops beating other protesters has gone viral on Chinese social media amid growing discontent toward the Chinese government’s strict zero-COVID policy.

  • Social media users have drawn a parallel between the defiance of the 1989 protester and the woman, who ended up being dragged away by health officials wearing anti-COVID protective suits.

  • The incident comes amid continued protests across the country, with many voicing their resistance to the government’s zero-COVID policy.

  • Protesters have also called for the resignation of President Xi Jinping in a rare display of defiance to the ruling Chinese Communist Party.

  • In Shanghai and Beijing, protestors have been presenting blank pieces of paper, similar to what Hong Kong protesters did during the 2020 demonstrations when China banned slogans and phrases linked to subversion.

Asian America Daily - in under 5 minutes

Get our collection of Asian America's most essential stories, to your inbox daily, for free!

Unsure? Check out our Newsletter Archive

A fearless Chinese woman is now being referred to online as the “new tank man” for her defiance against riot police during a violent protest dispersal in China.

Footage of the still unidentified woman refusing to move as she films troops beating other protesters has gone viral on Chinese social media amid growing discontent toward the Chinese government’s strict zero-COVID policy.

Her moniker is derived from the unknown protester who stood in front of a row of Type 59 tanks during the student-led Tiananmen protests in Beijing on June 5, 1989. 

Footage of the incident shows the man standing in front of the first tank to block the path of the tanks leaving Tiananmen Square. The man even climbs the lead tank and appears to speak to whoever was inside.

The iconic imagery of the “Tiananmen tank man” has become a symbol of the Chinese people’s resistance to its government.

Social media users have drawn a parallel between the defiance of the 1989 protester and the woman, who faced potential harm to document their violent treatment of protesters.

In the 25-second video shared by journalist Yashar Ali on Twitter, the woman is seen filming the riot police in full combat gear as they move toward the protesters and begin attacking them.

Shortly after, two officers confront her, with one smacking the mobile phone out of her hand while the other pushes her into what appear to be health workers wearing anti-COVID personal protective equipment suits. The woman is then dragged away by three of the purported health workers.

“Watch this brave woman stand strong and continue to film the abuses of Chinese government security forces,” Ali tweeted. “She then gets beaten herself! While we support the people of Iran, we must also support the brave people of China as they take on the totalitarian CCP!”

The clip ends when the person filming the incident is also confronted by a different health official, who is seen entering the frame before they swat away the cell phone being used to record. 

Protests across the country have continued since last week, with many voicing their resistance to the zero-COVID policy that is forcing millions of Chinese into city-wide lockdowns, quarantines and mass testing.

In a rare display of defiance to the ruling Chinese Communist Party, the protesters have also started calling for the resignation of President Xi Jinping.

In Shanghai and Beijing, protestors have been presenting blank pieces of paper, similar to what Hong Kong protesters did during the 2020 demonstrations when China banned slogans and phrases linked to subversion. 

“If the government were to release a blacklist of words, I am afraid it would have to update the list every day,” a Hong Kong protester told the AFP news agency at the time. “If you say the white papers are unlawful too then I will come out with papers in other colors.”

 

Featured Image via @yashar, CNN

Support our Journalism with a Contribution

Many people might not know this, but despite our large and loyal following which we are immensely grateful for, NextShark is still a small bootstrapped startup that runs on no outside funding or loans.

Everything you see today is built on the backs of warriors who have sacrificed opportunities to help give Asians all over the world a bigger voice.

However, we still face many trials and tribulations in our industry, from figuring out the most sustainable business model for independent media companies to facing the current COVID-19 pandemic decimating advertising revenues across the board.

We hope you consider making a contribution so we can continue to provide you with quality content that informs, educates and inspires the Asian community. Even a $1 contribution goes a long way.  Thank you for everyone's support. We love you all and can't appreciate you guys enough.

Support NextShark

Mastercard, Visa, Amex, Discover, Paypal