Woman Exposes Creeps With Asian Fetishes on Tinder, Turns Them into Memes

Tinder and other similar dating apps have become a useful tool for many to be able to meet new people for friendships, casual hookups, and even something more serious.

But along with romance and interesting conversations one would get from such services are the nasty messages filled with misogyny and creepiness from some really damaged individuals.

Lillian, a Tinder user who constantly receives awful chats from random guys, decided to have fun with them by turning these offensive, cringe-worthy attempts at pickup lines into hilarious memes.

“Millennial Garbagé” image via Instagram / thefleshlightchronicles

A senior political science and art history major in college, Lilian created the Instagram account LILLIAN x TINDER (thefleshlightchronicles), which became the repository for her abuse-turned-art posts.

“O-Ren Ishii is my forever mood ✨ Anyone knows a good cure for yellow fever? I heard a katana to the balls is a good one.”

The account, which has accumulated over 16,000 followers, began in November 2016 with a post showing a Tinder profile of a man with a cigarette, holding a Fleshlight sex toy (thus, the account name) which also had a cigarette in it.

In its caption, she wrote, “How to get a girl: Step 1, show her your fleshlight. Step 2, put a cigarette in your fleshlight.”

“Someone once asked me how I had the confidence of a White man—well babies let me just say, you are what you eat, and I happen to eat White men for breakfast.”

From that day forward, she began posting images usually of her with the Tinder messages edited in accompanied with witty captions that tackle issues such as sexism, racism, fetishization, and abuse head-on.

“I have a lot of beautiful friends, and at one point in my life, most of them happened to be beautiful White women. These messages speak to insecurities I had when I was younger, insecurities that many WOC still struggle with, about worth and respect and love in a body that is not White. Asian women are “the most desirable” — or so I’ve been told, by both online dating statistics and creepy White men at the club. Sometimes I can even delude myself into thinking I’m conventionally attractive. The reality though is that I am not, because the most that I (along with other WOC) can ever be seen as in this society is conventionally fetishizable. I am reminded of it time and time again, from these messages on social media to the way I am treated by White men in relation to White women. I am reminded again and again that I am nothing more than an exotic side project, a thing to be used and discarded once a “legitimate” White woman comes along. Please don’t reassure me that I’m pretty in the comments— I’ve already made peace with my body. But to all the women of color who haven’t, I want you to know that you aren’t alone in this pain, that you are valid, because worth is inherent and not constructed. You have lived long in your skin, and the beautiful thing is not how other people perceive it, but how you’ve suffered and then made it yours. ✨”

“I just got a lot of really terrible messages from men on Tinder and I made a finsta for it. It really began as a finsta and as it got to be more popular, I realized that this touched upon my own issues as a woman of color and I could talk about that,” she told student publication the Tufts Daily.

“It’s hard to make cringeface attractive but it’s even harder to make your weeaboo Asian fetish attractive. Had to swipe right when I saw that picture to see if he would say anything about me being Asian and was not disappointed ✨”

Along with the support and admiration she received from her growing following, she revealed that she also gets some heat from other individuals as well.

“I have gotten harassed by strangers [and by] people I know in real life, online. Luckily never in real life physically. Fearing for my own safety is definitely something that’s constantly on my mind,” she was quoted as saying.

“Trump probably said the same thing about Kim Jong Un last week idk”

Not minding her critics, Lilian intends to keep the Fleshlight Chronicles going.

“I can see myself continuing to do this. As of now, I don’t really know, it’s sort of hazy because honestly social media and making it an integral part of your professional life is such new territory that I can’t say for sure how I’m going to navigate that,” she said. “But it is something that I’m passionate about and that I hope to continue in the future.”

Images via Instagram / thefleshlightchronicles

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