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Taiwan World Cup

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Taiwan thanks Qatar for removing China reference from 2022 World Cup ID system

  • Taiwan thanked organizers of the World Cup in Qatar for modifying the identification system by removing the reference to China for Taiwanese attendees.

  • Taiwan’s Foreign Ministry had previously condemned organizers for not including a Taiwan nationality option.

  • The island’s demands appear to have been heard, however, because as of late Wednesday, World Cup ticket holders could register under “Taiwan,” complete with the Taiwanese flag.

  • In a statement of appreciation for the quick modification, Taiwan Foreign Ministry spokesperson Joanne Ou told reporters this was a “positive development,” and added, “We express our thanks and affirmation for this goodwill.”

  • In contrast, Beijing’s foreign ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin reiterated that “Taiwan is part of China,” adding that the “one China” policy was a “basic norm.”

Taiwan thanked organizers of the World Cup in Qatar for modifying the identification system by removing the reference to China for Taiwanese attendees.

Taiwan’s foreign ministry had previously condemned organizers for not including a Taiwan nationality option in their Hayya identification system, which also doubles as an entry visa for those attending the World Cup. 

On Wednesday, the system was updated to include “Taiwan, Province of China” with a Taiwanese flag included in the listing. 

The island expressed their dissatisfaction, with Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesperson Joanne Ou calling it “unacceptable.”

Taiwan’s demands appear to have been heard, however, because as of late Wednesday, World Cup ticket holders could then register under “Taiwan,” complete with the island’s national flag.

In a statement of appreciation for the quick modification, Taiwan foreign ministry spokesperson Joanne Ou told reporters it was a “positive development” and added, “We express our thanks and affirmation for this goodwill.”

In contrast, Beijing’s foreign ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin reiterated that “Taiwan is part of China,” adding that the “one China policy was a “basic norm” among international policies.

“We believe that the relevant parties will respect the one-China principle and resolve this matter in accordance with the consistent methods for international sporting competitions,” he stated at a briefing.

In order to avoid political conflict, Taiwan is usually referred to as “Chinese Taipei” at most international sporting events, including the Olympics.

China has made recent efforts to maintain its one-China principle, even stating last week that it would “not hesitate to start a war” if Taiwan were to split and declare independence from the mainland.

 

Featured Image via Hisense

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