Woman’s Death at ‘Orgy’ in Taiwan Exposes Rich Kids’ Drug Habits

The local fuerdai (富二代) culture, or the children of wealthy parents, in Taiwan is now under public scrutiny following the death of a 21-year-old woman. The death, suspected to be drug-related, allegedly occurred during a days-long party inside a luxury hotel in Taipei.

Local police reports described the scene as “an orgy” devoid of any morality when it was first found, Taipei Times reported.

The woman’s body, which was discovered naked inside a hotel room, was later found to have evidence of alcohol and narcotics in her system. Traces of a street drug based on ketamine, a dangerous prohibited substance, were reportedly found.

Advertisement

The authorities said that the “home parties” thrown by the “rich second generation” Chinese known as the “Fuerdai” have recently grown to be quite popular in Taiwan.

One unidentified official claimed that the drug dealers and certain hotel or club operators are riding on the trend, with some establishments converting their spaces into sex and drug nests for “Fuerdai” partygoers.

Some children of rich families have tried and used marijuana legally during their college years abroad and would want to continue the habit when they return to Taiwan.

Advertisement

Five-star hotels are reportedly the venue of choice among party attendees since police rarely visit such areas. Party hosts reportedly act as the central contact for drugs and escorts businesses.

According to one previous attendee to a similar party,  participants begin by casually conversing between each other before ultimately engaging in sexual activities, usually laden with drugs and alcohol.

The source revealed that at the party, people immediately “lose themselves” at the moment drugs take over their bodies. According to the police, the drugs found on the streets are sometimes added with other chemicals that have been known to cause permanent damage to the body.

Advertisement

Editor’s note: The previous headline for this article stated that the individuals were Chinese when they were actually Taiwanese. We have made the correction and we deeply regret our error. 

Total
0
Shares
Related Posts