Korean Artists Creates Stunning Watercolor Paintings of the Cities She’s Visited

We travel for different reasons. Some break free from the stress brought by work, while others catch up with family and friends based somewhere else.

And of course, there are those who fly miles just to get something posted on Instagram. See, anyone who travels these days almost always takes photos, because, why not?

Cologne, Germany

But one Korean artist makes something out of her trips most of us probably don’t — paintings.

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Zagreb, Coatia

Sunga Park, a graphic designer and illustrator based in Bangkok, documents her travels in the form of seemingly unfinished watercolor paintings — and they’re uniquely beautiful.

Paris, France

Colossal described her work as a “mixture of detailed elements and watery abstraction,” which results in “hazy, dreamlike imagery that seems to constantly surprise and intrigue as if lifted directly from a memory.”

Ayasofya, Istanbul

“I was never convinced about going to an art school at all,” Park said in an interview with Japan Cinema. “When I was a little girl, I didn’t want to do what most people did. 

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Busan, Korea

“When I saw all of my friends who attended after-school art classes paint perfectly in the same way for a sketching contest during a field trip, I decided against going to art school.  I was afraid I would get into a habit of mimicking teachers who graduated from art school.”

Harrods, London, UK

After deciding not to go art school, Park went to college and majored in economics, but quickly found out that she just wasn’t interested in it.

“I started taking history and philosophy classes without permission between my required classes,” Park said. “I kept studying other subjects until a professor caught on to what I was doing and kicked me out of the classroom.  This didn’t drive me to art directly, but taught me how to think more about art and life.”

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Stockholm, Swedan

“The only purpose of leaving space and unfinished details is to lure in the imagination of the viewer, as the beauty of space does in oriental paintings.  I really love how the painting creates new outlines in space.  I was taught from books that the beauty of space exists for the viewer.”

Venice, Italy

You can check out more on her personal website, where she profiles her artwork.

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