‘Welcome to hell’: Video of handler abusing dog at training school in Singapore sparks outrage

  • A video of a dog being abused by a handler at a training school in Singapore went viral on Wednesday, sparking outrage on social media.
  • The Animal and Veterinary Service (AVS) and Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) are now investigating the case shared on Facebook by the animal welfare group Chained Dog Awareness in Singapore (CDAS).
  • The unidentified trainer can be seen yelling at the mixed-breed dog and hitting it with a metal food bowl.
  • The AVS said it was aware of the two-minute video circulating online and has already suspended the handler from its list of accredited dog trainers since March 25.
  • A person found guilty of abusing an animal is subjected to a fine of 15,000 Singaporean dollars (approximately $10,000) and/or imprisonment not exceeding 18 months for the first offense. A second or subsequent offense could land the person a jail sentence not exceeding three years and/or a fine of 30,000 Singaporean dollars (approximately $21,000).

The Animal and Veterinary Service (AVS) in Singapore has launched an investigation into a dog training school that also offers boarding services after one of its handlers was caught on video abusing one of the dogs.

The viral video that captured the dog abuse was shared on Facebook by the animal welfare group Chained Dog Awareness in Singapore (CDAS) on Wednesday. A handler can be seen in the video yelling at the dog and hitting it with a metal food bowl.

Warning: The video below contains graphic content.

Welcome to hell, my friend. Four weeks of hell,” the man tells the dog, according to the transcription provided by CDAS in the comment section. “F*cking Indian dog,” the man says at one point in the video.

The man also hits the dog with a metal bowl, causing the mixed-breed Singapore Special to push its back onto the brick wall enclosure and bare its teeth at the abuser.

The CDAS wrote in the comment section that the incident was filmed at K9 Connections, a dog training school that also offers boarding services, located at MacPherson Road, Singapore. The video also indicates that the incident happened on March 20.

Xiao Hei will tell you how the f*ck he suffer,” the man says at one point in the video, purportedly referring to another dog under his care.

In a statement to AsiaOne, the AVS said it was aware of the two-minute video circulating online and has already suspended the handler from its list of accredited dog trainers since March 25.

Speaking to The Strait Times, Aarthi Sankar, executive director of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA), said the SPCA received reports of the viral video and is now assisting the investigation into the case.

We are deeply disturbed by the actions portrayed in the video as they are both abusive towards animals and insensitive towards humans,” she said. “Based on the audio, we are also concerned that the perpetrator may have treated other animals under his care in a similar manner.”

Sankar added that the SPCA was also made aware of other incidents that happened at K9 Connection, such as rough handling of animals, and that the cases have already been forwarded to authorities.

On the K9 Connection Facebook page, the company claims they use a science-based approach in their dog training under their IAABC and AVS accredited trainers. The account appears to have been taken down amid the controversy.

CDAS’ video, which amassed over 47,000 views as of writing, sparked outrage among social media users, with one user questioning what other sorts of abuses were not caught on camera.

What I find extremely scary is that there is a CCTV recording everything. And since it’s a boarding house, owners are supposedly able to log in any time to check on their dog,” a Facebook user wrote. “Can you imagine what this guy may be doing in hidden corners or when the cctv is off?”

NParks AVS accredited trainer. How are these accreditations given to monsters like these?” another user wrote. “This man needs to be in jail for violent abuse and making racist remarks,” the user added, tagging the Singapore Police Force in the comment.

Under Singapore’s Animals and Birds Act, a person found guilty of animal abuse is subject to a fine of 15,000 Singaporean dollars (approximately $10,717) and/or imprisonment not exceeding 18 months for the first offense. A second or subsequent offense could land the person a jail sentence not exceeding three years and/or a fine of 30,000 Singaporean dollars (approximately $21,435).

 

Feature Image via Chained Dog Awareness in Singapore

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