Japanese Ramen Linked to Heart Attack and Stroke Risk, Study Says

ramen stroke

A recent study in Japan has reportedly found a link between eating ramen and dying from heart attacks.

Researchers from Jichi Medical University investigated the association between the prevalence of ramen restaurants and stroke mortality in Japanese prefectures, Quartz reports.

In the paper published in Nutrition Journal, the scientists studied the health data of a variety of cuisine types from different regions.

The research team compared food items in Japanese prefectures under four categories: ramen, fast food, French or Italian and udon or soba. They also took into account age and sex in relation to stroke and heart attack mortality rates in each prefecture in 2017.

A recent study in Japan has reportedly found a link between eating ramen and dying from heart attacks.

Based on their findings, areas with more ramen restaurants such as the Tohoku, northern Kanto, and southern Kyushu regions had higher numbers of deaths from strokes compared to other areas in Japan.

“Ramen, a popular food in Japan, is high in carbohydrates and salt and thus may increase the risk of stroke mortality. Our findings indicate a correlation between the regional prevalence of ramen restaurants and stroke mortality,” concluded the study.

The researchers did make clear in their paper, however, that they were unable to obtain data on the stroke victims’ exact diets. They further admitted that they lacked data on citizens who consumed instant or homemade ramen.

The report also noted that the different side dishes provided by ramen restaurants “may include confounding nutritional factors” that have not been taken into account. Various ramen dishes found in the prefectures also contained different levels of soy, tonkotshu broth ingredients, miso, and salt.

Feature Image via Vardan Sevan

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