Quadriplegic Chinese streamer beats challenging ‘Elden Ring’ game using his mouth and breath

quadriplegic Chinese gamer Elden Ring
Image: BiliBili
  • Zhu Mingjun, a quadriplegic streamer, beat “Elden Ring,” one of the most difficult games released this year, using custom code, a mouth controller and his breath.
  • The 29-year-old former firefighter, who comes from eastern China’s Shandong Province, became paralyzed from the neck down after falling while on duty on July 9, 2013.
  • Zhu started giving public speeches in the city of Anqiu in 2018 to talk about his condition before taking up livestreaming.
  • He initially relied on his mother to help him move his character around in “Elden Ring,” but after acquiring a custom mouth controller, he can now play his video games without any assistance.
  • “Livestreaming has changed my life dramatically,” Zhu said. “I have got to know too many new friends [through livestreaming]. I am not alone like before. I am enjoying the happiness brought by livestreaming. On top of that, I can earn money from it.”

A quadriplegic Chinese gamer and streamer has managed to beat “Elden Ring” using a custom mouth controller and his breath.

Zhu Mingjun, 29, showcased his skills in a video posted on BiliBili, where he demonstrated his swift moves in evading oncoming attacks from the notoriously difficult game’s seven main bosses.

The former firefighter, who comes from eastern China’s Shandong Province, became paralyzed from the neck down after falling while on duty on July 9, 2013. The incident left him unable to talk for three years. He still needs a ventilator to breathe, but he is able to move his head and some parts of his torso.

Zhu initially had to rely on his mother to help him move his character around in “Elden Ring,” but after acquiring a custom mouth controller, he can now play various video games without any assistance. He explained in one of his videos that he uses custom code, different breathing combinations and the two tubes connected to his mouth controller to move his character in-game.

He started giving public speeches in the city of Anqiu in 2018 to talk about his condition before taking up livestreaming. Now, he reportedly streams for two to three hours every evening to around 80,000 fans, and some of his videos have already garnered millions of views. 

Livestreaming has changed my life dramatically,” Zhu told South China Morning Post. “I have got to know too many new friends [through livestreaming]. I am not alone like before. I am enjoying the happiness brought by livestreaming. On top of that, I can earn money from it.”

 

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