Offensive Tweets From ‘The Good Place’ Producer Resurface After Supporting BLM

megan amram

Editor’s Note: This article has been updated with an apology from Megan Amram posted to Twitter on June 17.

Television comedy writer, producer and performer Megan Amram has recently been speaking out about Black Lives Matter and using her social platforms to support important causes. 

At first glance, the Harvard grad appears to be all for social justice and racial equality.

Amram, who is known for past work on popular television shows including “The Good Place,” “Parks and Recreation,” and “Transparent,” even recently recommended a podcast that discussed Hollywood’s racist past called “You Must Remember This.”

Amram called the podcast very “well-researched” and covers the “shameful angles” of the movie and television making industry.

However, some social media users have raised questions over her sincerity in supporting such causes after several of her old racist tweets targeting Asian Americans emerged.

One Twitter user shared how the comedian blocked her after replying in disbelief to one of her posts back in 2011. 

In the original tweet, Amram wrote: “It’s not politically correct to say ‘r*tarded’ anymore, you have to call them ‘Asian Americans’”

In response, user @alyssakeiko expressed her disappointment, saying: “What the f*ck Megan.”

Instead of addressing her post, Amram responded by blocking the Twitter user. 

Also recently unearthed were Amram’s tweets which included the “can’t tell Asians apart” reference, “killing Jews, gypsies and gays” and other apparent attempts at humor. 

Back in January, Filipino American comic book creator Joshua Luna also shared his observation on an Asian character featured in Amram’s show “The Good Place.”

“In light of Megan Amram’s (writer & co-executive producer of The Good Place) tweet surfacing that calls Asian Americans r*tarded, I can say I honestly felt that from the show from the jump. I love Manny Jacinto, but absolutely despise how Filipinos are portrayed in the show,” Luna started in a series of tweets.

“While I enjoy the show on some level, Jason is not nearly as humanized as the other characters & I had to push myself to watch season 3…It was clear that depicting Filipinos as d*mb (which I now know is an ableist term) was more than just a gag for the show writers.”

 

View this post on Instagram

 

I’ve been posting a lot of places to donate (to help bailing out protestors, to help reform cash bail in this country, to support defunding police and finding community alternatives, etc.) on my Twitter, but if you only know me on Instagram I wanted to say something here too, specifically to my white followers (though I am wary of white people centering the story of american racism and anti-Blackness around our own learning process and growth, rather than the countless victims of racism and anti-Blackness and their pain): Every white person, myself of COURSE included, needs to wake up every day and reaffirm their dedication to anti-racism and to unlearning white supremacy, be it yesterday or today or in a year or in a hundred. I am so grateful to the Black people and more specifically Black women like Ijeoma that I have become friends with and fans of and who have been trying to help and lead us through the work for years, tirelessly answering the same questions over and over again from white people. My own journey of anti-racism has been one filled with shame and embarrassment and epiphanies of past complacency or active pain caused that no amount of enlightenment can atone for. I don’t mean to preach because who am I to tell anyone anything, I am admittedly stupid and ignorant, but speaking for myself, I decided years ago — not early enough, it can never be early enough — to try to examine white supremacy in every facet of my life, to recognize it, to dismantle it in whatever little way I can, and I reaffirm my dedication to that work today. Also, just as a reminder, rich white people are allowed to give more than $50 to a charity. #BlackLivesMatter

A post shared by Megan Amram (@meganamram) on

In a recent post expressing her support to the Black community, Amram she subtly hinted her past ignorance on the issue.

“My own journey of anti-racism has been one filled with shame and embarrassment and epiphanies of past complacency or active pain caused that no amount of enlightenment can atone for,” she wrote.

“I don’t mean to preach because who am I to tell anyone anything, I am admittedly stupid and ignorant, but speaking for myself, I decided years ago — not early enough, it can never be early enough — to try to examine white supremacy in every facet of my life, to recognize it, to dismantle it in whatever little way I can, and I reaffirm my dedication to that work today.”

On Wednesday, June 17, Amram posted an apology on Twitter, specifically mentioning her offenses to the Asian American community:

Feature Image (left) via @meganamram, (right) Getty

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