K-drama dominance continues as new shows ‘Thirty-Nine’ and ‘Juvenile Justice’ break Netflix Global Top 10

netflix k dramas
  • South Korean shows continue to dominate the charts with series “Thirty-nine” and “Juvenile Justice” breaking into Netflix’s Global Top 10.
  • JTBC’s “Thirty-Nine,” set to finish March 24, is the story of three unmarried women who reflect on their time together and remaining when one of them falls terminally ill.
  • The second Korean Netflix original of the year, “Juvenile Justice,” which highlights controversy surrounding Korea’s juvenile criminal justice system, debuted this past Friday and immediately topped several global charts.

The past weekend once again showed the dominance of South Korean dramas, as “Thirty-Nine” and “Juvenile Justice” both broke into Netflix’s Global Top 10 rankings.  

According to FlixPatrol, a site that tracks streaming data from popular video platforms, both ranked among the top 10 most-watched Netflix shows in the world. South Korea continues to attract a global audience and proves its industry is not just a one-hit wonder with the success of “Squid Games,” which premiered last year. 

JTBC’s “Thirty-Nine,” released Wednesday, Feb. 16, is the story of three unmarried women and their close friendship. When one of them falls terminally ill, the three reflect on their time spent together as well as how to spend their remaining time. 

The drama stars renowned actors Son Ye-jin (“Crash Landing on You”) and Jeon Mi-Do (“Hospital Playlist”), as well as Kim Ji-hyun (“Justice”) in her first lead role. The final episode of Season 1 is set to air March 24. 

“Juvenile Justice,” the second Korean Netflix original of the year, premiered just this past Friday, Feb. 25. Immediately after its release, it topped several global charts in Asia; however, it did not do as well in the U.S. unlike its predecessor “All of Us Are Dead,” which has made a home for itself in the domestic top 10 since its release in January. 

“Juvenile Justice” centers around Judge Shim Eun-suk, played by Kim Hye-soo (“Hyena”), and her many juvenile delinquent cases. The series highlights South Korea’s controversial juvenile system in which offenders under 14 years of age are not held criminally responsible for their actions but are instead sent to reformatory centers for a chance at rehabilitation. The show’s trailer starts with a young person laughing in court knowing they cannot be punished severely. 

Featured image via Netflix Asia

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