Kit Kat in Japan Ditches Plastic Wrapper for Paper That Can Become Origami

It is no secret by now that Kit Kats everywhere else have got nothing on those found in Japan, not only in terms of flavor variety but also the creativity in presentation and packaging.

Taking this discrepancy a step further is Nestlé Japan’s move to introduce a radical change to the look of their Kit Kat range. Beginning at the end of September, the company is reportedly replacing Kit Kat’s plastic packaging with paper, SoraNews24 reports. 

It is no secret by now that Kit Kats everywhere else have got nothing on those found in Japan, not only in terms of flavor variety but also the creativity in presentation and packaging. 

The initiative, which will allow Nestlé to save at least 418 tons of plastic each year, is part of the company’s commitment to only use 100% recyclable and reusable packaging by 2025. To start, only five of the brand’s larger sized products will feature the new paper packaging. 

The Kit Kat Mini Original:

It is no secret by now that Kit Kats everywhere else have got nothing on those found in Japan, not only in terms of flavor variety but also the creativity in presentation and packaging. 

The Kit Kat Mini Otona no Amasa (Adult Sweetness):

It is no secret by now that Kit Kats everywhere else have got nothing on those found in Japan, not only in terms of flavor variety but also the creativity in presentation and packaging. 

The Kit Kat Mini Otona no Amasa Matcha:

It is no secret by now that Kit Kats everywhere else have got nothing on those found in Japan, not only in terms of flavor variety but also the creativity in presentation and packaging. 

The Kit Kat Mini Otona no Amasa Strong Matcha:It is no secret by now that Kit Kats everywhere else have got nothing on those found in Japan, not only in terms of flavor variety but also the creativity in presentation and packaging. 

The convenience-store exclusive Kit Kat Mini Original packs:

It is no secret by now that Kit Kats everywhere else have got nothing on those found in Japan, not only in terms of flavor variety but also the creativity in presentation and packaging. 

Nestlé is promoting the new packaging by encouraging customers to turn the packets into paper cranes, which they can write messages on and then give to loved ones. Turning the wrapper into origami is one way of highlighting the idea of reusing and recycling materials.

 It is no secret by now that Kit Kats everywhere else have got nothing on those found in Japan, not only in terms of flavor variety but also the creativity in presentation and packaging. 

Nestlé is hoping to eventually expand the use of reusable packaging to other products in their range as well. 

Featured image via Nestlé Japan

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