Japanese Wife’s Secret Instagram of Her Messy Husband Gets Over 190,000 Followers

A Japanese wife dedicating an Instagram page to all the mess her husband makes at home has become the unofficial representative of those sick of living with untidy people.

A Japanese wife dedicating an Instagram page to all the mess her husband makes at home has become the unofficial representative of those sick of living with untidy people.

The account, which goes by the username @gomi_sutero — literally translating to “throw your trash away” — has amassed more than 191,000 followers since its first post in July 2018.

The page is filled with photos of trash, misplaced objects, dirty clothes and disorganized things, with occasional snaps of the woman’s adorable baby girl as a break.

The photos also come with hilarious, in-your-face captions that make them much more lighthearted, suggesting that this wife must not feel completely annoyed about all the mess.

“If it fell, pick it up!” the overlay says in one photo.

Another description says, “If you have time to do this, you have time to throw away a tissue.”

The woman has kept herself anonymous, though she frequently uses the hashtag #Fukuokamama, hinting that she must reside in Fukuoka, southern Japan.

Her bio also states, “Please don’t tell any nearby men 180 centimeters (5 feet and 10 inches) tall about this account!”, “If you know us please keep this account a secret!” and “Honey, if you’ve found this, please forgive me!”

The page apparently owes much of its popularity to Twitter user @butagorirasatu1, who shared it to her followers when it still had some 30,000 followers, SoraNews24 noted.

After @butagorirasatu1’s tweet, the page blew up to more than 120,000 followers and has clearly grown since then.

Despite her ramblings, the woman writes in her profile that their “marital relationship is good.”

Needless to say, many found her posts to be relatable, with some claiming that she has become the voice they never had.

“My sympathies go with you.”

“My husband does something similar often.”

“It feels like I’m looking at my husband’s behavior.”

“It’s completely the same at home and I’m now following all the mess involuntarily.”

“Is this actually my husband? As much as I can thought [sic] of smiling when I saw something similar, I remember wanting to kill him.”

Featured Images via Instagram / @gomi_sutero

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