Hong Kong Actor Calls Out Wedding Guest for Giving Only $40 in a Red Packet

Last week, Hong Kong actor Jazz Lam celebrated his first wedding anniversary with wife Kary Dong — reminding fans of the lavish ceremony that had 63 banquet tables for over 600 guests, including top celebrities.

 

“I am sincere and love you the most,” Lam wrote in a Facebook post, accompanied by a photo of himself and his wife.

Interestingly, a now-deleted exchange between the actor and a guest suggesting an acceptable amount for a wedding gift caught the attention of users in the comments.

“The ‘kindness’ you showed me is unforgettable!” Lam wrote before reminding the male guest of the “300 Hong Kong dollars ($38.25),” according to Apple Daily.

In his defense, the guest claimed that he remembered putting 500 Hong Kong dollars ($63.75) in the red packet and apologized if the actor was actually telling the truth.

Lam replied assuring the guest that it was totally fine, but the fact that the latter had asked to be invited to the wedding in the first place made him and his wife laugh at the red packet.

“I think you made a mistake, but it’s okay. A 300 Hong Kong dollars debt of kindness is fine. And if you have no money, that’s fine too. I can even give you a treat.

“But the funny thing is that you messaged me on Facebook to say you’d like to attend my wedding … and this was the result. It made my wife and I laugh.

“You can’t really put a value on kindness, but if you’re tight financially, I can give you a treat, just say so.”

The conversation reportedly ended with Lam inviting the guest to survey hotel wedding banquet prices on the internet.

Speaking to reporters, the actor — who has long earned a reputation for being funny, thanks to his comedic roles — clarified that he had made his comments in jest. He also confirmed that the story is true, but not that it truly matters.

“I won’t talk anymore, or my friend will feel ashamed. He told me that he didn’t know the market rate and I said it’s fine, it’s not important.”

He added that the guest is not actually a friend, but an acquaintance.

“Anyway, he’s actually not my friend, but a friend’s friend.”

Featured Images via Wikimedia Commons / Prattflora (CC BY-SA 3.0) and Facebook / @lamtszsin413

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