Animal Crossing Brewster

The café pigeon ‘Animal Crossing’ fans all know and love is coming back to the series

Dune star Chang Chen impressed by Timothee Chalamet

Taiwanese star Chang Chen impressed with Timothée Chalamet speaking Mandarin lines ‘perfectly’ in ‘Dune’

cards get changed by Oxford

How one UK educator convinced a publishing company to redo their flashcards depicting Asians with slant-eyes

Squid Games is number one

‘Squid Game’ is the first Korean series to rank No. 1 on Netflix in the US

World

The café pigeon ‘Animal Crossing’ fans all know and love is coming back to the series

Animal Crossing Brewster
Read More

Brewster, a much-loved character from the “Animal Crossing” video game series, was confirmed to be returning to the Switch entry in the series during the most recent Nintendo Direct presentation.  

“Coo”: The coffee-loving pigeon, who first appeared in the video game “Animal Crossing: Wild World” for the Nintendo DS in 2005, has been confirmed by Nintendo to reappear in the newest content update for the Switch’s “Animal Crossing New Horizons,” according to Polygon

Taiwanese star Chang Chen impressed with Timothée Chalamet speaking Mandarin lines ‘perfectly’ in ‘Dune’

Dune star Chang Chen impressed by Timothee Chalamet
Read More

Chang Chen, who rose to fame in Ang Lee’s “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” is praising one of his co-stars for their Mandarin skills in the upcoming science-fiction epic, “Dune.”

Speaking Mandarin: Chen told CNA Lifestyle in an interview that accepting the role of Dr. Wellington Yueh, the personal physician for the Atreides family, in the latest live-action adaptation of Frank Herbert’s novel was an “easy decision.”

How one UK educator convinced a publishing company to redo their flashcards depicting Asians with slant-eyes

cards get changed by Oxford
Read More

During his fourth year of teaching in the U.K., primary school educator John Luk noticed something concerning about his classroom resources. While looking at a set of phonics flashcards produced by Read Write Inc., he realized that the Asian characters were illustrated with slits for their eyes.

Instead of staying silent, Luk took action. He wrote a letter of complaint, noting that the flashcards in question — a revamp of a previous set of cards that depicted fewer POC characters —  are currently being used in schools worldwide. According to Luk, children aged 4 to 7 in the U.K. must learn phonics, and only a few organizations create phonics schemes to be distributed to schools across the U.K., with Read Write Inc. Phonics being one of them. Their popular phonics cards, which are published by Oxford University Press, are used in more than 5,000 schools in the U.K., as well as in nine states in the U.S. and hundreds of schools around the world.