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No charges for driver who fatally struck California county official

  • No charges will be filed against the motorist who fatally struck Alameda County Supervisor Wilma Chan on Nov. 3, 2021, District Attorney Nancy O’Malley’s office announced on Thursday.

  • Chan, 72, was walking her dog and crossing the street on the corner of Grand Street and Shoreline Drive when the driver hit her.

  • In a statement, O’Malley said a very “thorough” and “comprehensive” investigation into the case found that no charges “could be filed, sustained, or proved beyond a reasonable doubt.”

  • O’Malley said the community continues to mourn Chan’s death and that her loss leaves a “void” in the county.

  • Chan was the first Asian American elected to the Alameda County Board of Supervisors and the first woman and first Asian American  majority leader of the California State Assembly.

The Alameda County District Attorney’s Office will not file charges against the motorist who fatally struck County Supervisor Wilma Chan last year.

In a news release, District Attorney Nancy O’Malley said their investigation into the case found that no charges “could be filed, sustained or proved beyond a reasonable doubt.” The driver, who remained at the scene until police arrived, reportedly cooperated throughout the investigation.

“The investigation of the death of Supervisor Chan was very thorough and comprehensive,” the district attorney said on Thursday. “Based on the investigation, including hours of witness interviews and a re-creation of the scene, and the careful review of the law, the District Attorney’s Office determined that no charges against the driver of the car could be filed, sustained, or proved beyond a reasonable doubt.”

Chan, 72, was crossing the street with her dog at Grand Street and Shoreline Drive when she was hit by a car at around 8 a.m. on Nov. 3, 2021. She died later at Highland Hospital.

Chan was the first Asian American elected to the Alameda County Board of Supervisors in 1995. Five years later, she was elected to the California State Assembly, becoming its first woman and first Asian American majority leader.

O’Malley said Chan’s death has left a “void” in the county.

“Our community continues to mourn the loss of Supervisor Chan; our hearts are still broken. The impact on our community made by Supervisor Chan will live on forever. Her loss leaves a void in Alameda County.”

Chan returned to the Board of Supervisors in 2011 to serve District 3. After her death, her seat was filled by Dave Brown, who will stand trial next month to address a legal challenge regarding his eligibility.

 

Featured Image via NBC Bay Area

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