Chinese man accused of exploiting children for racist videos extradited to Malawi

  • Lu Ke, a Chinese national, is accused of exploiting Malawian children for racist videos to be sold on Chinese social media.
  • Known to the kids as Susu, Lu Ke fled to Zambia after a BBC Africa Eye documentary exposed his alleged money-making scheme last month.
  • Lu Ke allegedly paid each child less than a dollar to star in his videos, which he then sold for up to $70 each.
  • He allegedly produced up to 380 videos each day, earning about 77 million kwacha (approximately $75,300).
  • Zambia handed Lu Ke over to Malawi on Saturday, and he is now expected to stand trial in a Malawian court.

A Chinese man accused of exploiting Malawian children for racist videos to be sold in China has been extradited to Malawi, according to reports.

Lu Ke, known to the children as Susu, fled to neighboring Zambia last month after a BBC Africa Eye documentary exposed his alleged money-making scheme.

Lu Ke allegedly paid each child half a dollar to perform in his videos, which he sold for up to $70 each on Chinese social media. Reports say he made up to 380 videos a day, raking in about 77 million kwacha (approximately $75,300).

In one of the videos, children in matching shirts are seen chanting phrases such as “I am a Black monster” and “My IQ is low” in Chinese. One child alleged that Lu Ke would beat them if they disobeyed his orders.

On June 20, Malawi’s Department of Immigration and Citizenship Services confirmed that the Chinese national was arrested in the Zambian town of Chipata. Four days later, Chipata Resident Magistrate Mercy Chibo reportedly ordered Lu Ke to pay 13,000 Zambian kwacha (approximately $790) for illegal entry and illegal stay.

Malawi’s Homeland Security, Justice and Foreign Affairs ministries have since worked together to request Lu Ke’s extradition. The process was eventually completed and Zambia handed him over on Saturday, July 16.

Comfort Mankhwazi, president of the University of Malawi Child Rights Legal Clinic which led protests that erupted in the aftermath of the BBC exposé, is optimistic about the news.

“We truly hope that this extradition and the arrest will lead to something big like the prosecution in our courts and finally those victims will be able to get justice they deserve,” Mankhwazi told VOA News.

Lu Ke is expected to stand trial in a Malawian court. As of Sunday, Chinese authorities have not made a public statement regarding his extradition.

The Chinese Embassy in Malawi previously said it condemns racism “in any form, by anyone or happening anywhere.” The consulate added that they will “closely work with the Malawi side and see to it that this unfortunate issue be properly addressed.”

Featured Image via BBC News Africa

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