Chinese influencers now required to prove qualifications to talk about topics like finance, medicine

  • China’s influencers will now be required to prove they are qualified when giving medicinal, financial or legal advice on their social media.
  • On Tuesday, China’s State Administration of Radio and Television and the Ministry of Culture and Tourism released a joint statement outlining a new “code of conduct.”
  • The new mandate requires any influencer livestreaming content that calls for a “higher professional level,” to be qualified in the area.
  • Failure to abide by the code could lead to becoming permanently banned from livestreaming as well as being featured on Beijing’s public shame list of violators.
  • The news comes amid China’s recent efforts to tighten regulations on online content, including a ban on children under 16 years old from watching livestreams after 10 p.m.

China’s influencers will now be required to prove they are qualified when giving medicinal, financial or legal advice on their social media. 

On Tuesday, China’s State Administration of Radio and Television and the Ministry of Culture and Tourism released a joint statement outlining a new “code of conduct.” 

The new mandate requires any influencer livestreaming content that calls for a “higher professional level,” to be qualified in the area. 

Streaming platforms will now be responsible for reviewing a streamer’s qualifications and approving the content before broadcast. 

Also included in the code of conduct are rules against criticizing the Communist Party or traditional Chinese culture and the prohibition of posting content that threatens national security. 

No livestream can show “excessive” horror or be too sexually provocative, and livestreamers cannot promote smoking or drinking, participate in activities that show excessive food waste or engage in scandals or gossip.  

Failure to abide by the code could lead to becoming permanently banned from livestreaming as well as being featured on Beijing’s public shame list of violators.  

The news comes amid China’s recent efforts to tighten regulations on online content. 

Earlier this month the country’s cybersecurity regulator, Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC), unveiled its new initiative to counter cyberbullying and illicit, online content featuring pornography, suicide and violence. 

Last month, China announced its ban on children under 16 years old from buying online gifts for influencers and watching live streaming content after 10 p.m.

 

Featured Image via Moses Londo

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