Meet the 24-Year-Old Woman Who Started Her Own Avocado Restaurant in Singapore



A growing number of people are making sure that clean and healthy living is a major part of their lifestyle. The trend itself is even a viable concept to profit off of in business, which is exactly what one 24-year-old young entrepreneur in Singapore chose to do.

Charlotte Wang once faced the difficulty of finding tasty but healthy food in Singapore which gave her the idea to start her business. It’s now been two years since she started her healthy good restaurant Guac and Go, which prominently features avocados.

According to The New Paper (via AsiaOne), Wang studied art business management and pursued a career in marketing and sales.

She knew that starting her food business was not going to be easy and gave herself six months of working to figure out whether it was what she really wanted to do. In the end, she was assured.

It is unknown how much capital Wang started with or raised, or the process of establishing a location for her restaurant, but in the early stages of the business, it was just Wang, her boyfriend and her mother who managed the shop. She admitted that there were many days when she had to get up early in the morning, sleep late at night, and deal with the crazy demands of running a food business:

“It was quite crazy, running for the last bus kind of crazy. Sleeping at midnight, waking up at 6am to rush down and open the shop… It was fun, but I do not miss it.”

Another issue was managing employees who were older than her, which seemed a bit awkward when she gave them orders.

“I used to be staff. Suddenly, I had to manage people and tell them what to do,” Wang said. “When I started, there were some people who would not contact me. They would contact my boyfriend instead, because they thought he was the boss.”

There were also some sacrifices that she had to make like giving up her social life and dealing with the “nitty and gritty” part of the business, but she stood firm and buckled up, and here she is now, a young business owner at 24.

“For the first two years, I was a bit miserable that I had to give up my social life. I really did feel quite lonely – the only people I got to meet were at the cafe.”

“It is really not easy… the long hours, and you got to do the nitty gritty. Even the gross stuff, such as washing dirty dishes and picking up used tissue. Some things just make you want to cry.”

NextShark is a leading source covering Asian American News and Asian News including business, culture, entertainment, politics, tech and lifestyle.

For advertising and inquiries: info@nextshark.com