Cedar tree in Japan bears uncanny resemblance to Totoro from Studio Ghibli’s ‘My Neighbor Totoro’

TOTORO TREE
  • Kosugi no Osugi (The Great Cedar of Kosugi), known by locals and visitors as the Totoro Tree, has been gaining a strong following online thanks to its striking resemblance to Totoro from Studio Ghibli’s 1988 film “My Neighbor Totoro.”
  • The “double-eared” cedar tree is 20 meters (approximately 65.62 feet) tall and can be found in the rural town of Sakegawa in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan.
  • “There was a forest where it looks like you can meet Totoro,” Japanese photographer Yamadayama wrote in a tweet on Friday highlighting the tree.

A “double-eared” cedar tree in Japan has been gaining a strong following online thanks to its striking resemblance to the ever-so-cuddly forest spirit Totoro, a character from Studio Ghibli’s 1988 film “My Neighbor Totoro.”

Kosugi no Osugi (The Great Cedar of Kosugi), affectionately known by locals and visitors as the Totoro Tree, is 20 meters (approximately 65.62 feet) tall and can be found in the rural town of Sakegawa in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan.

Japanese photographer Yamadayama tweeted a picture of the famous cedar tree on Friday and wrote, “There was a forest where it looks like you can meet Totoro.”

While the Totoro Tree has reportedly been around for almost 1,000 years, it only became widely known online in 2020. People began visiting Sakegawa to get a glimpse of the massive cedar tree, with some fans even recreating the iconic umbrella scene from “My Neighbor Totoro” while standing next to  it.

In September 2020, SankeiBiz posted a timelapse video of the tree that highlights its uncanny resemblance to Totoro, which becomes even more apparent at night.

A report from the same year claimed that the tree’s appearance has changed slightly due to the growth of a third prong. Residents have asked for the tree to be trimmed to maintain its Totoro-like appearance, but the local government explained that it is considered sacred, especially by those who practice the indigenous Shinto religion.

The recent revival of interest in the Totoro Tree is perfect timing as Studio Ghibli’s beloved film, directed by legendary director Hayao Miyazaki, is getting a London stage play adaptation with Ghibli composer Joe Hisaishi as its producer.

 

Featured Image via SankeiNews

Total
3
Shares
Related Posts