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Cambodia 1,500-year-old krishna statute

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Cambodia’s 1,500-year-old Krishna statue showcased in National Museum of Asian Art virtual experience

  • An immersive experience featuring the newly restored, 1,500-year-old Cambodian stone sculpture “Krishna Lifting Mountain Govardhan” is currently on display at the National Museum of Asian Art (NMAA).

  • Restoration of the statue was undertaken by the Cleveland Museum of Art’s conservation specialists with permission from the Government of the Kingdom of Cambodia.

  • Apart from the newly-restored Krishna’s unveiling, the exhibit is also integrating an interactive design that employs art, virtual tours and immersive video installations to tell the sculpture’s story.

  • The exhibition also includes the showing of an original short film called “Satook” by renowned Cambodian American filmmaker PraCh Ly.

  • “Revealing Krishna: Journey to Cambodia’s Sacred Mountain” can be viewed from April 30 to  Sept. 18, 2022.

The National Museum of Asian Art (NMAA) is currently hosting a focus exhibition featuring the newly restored, 1,500-year-old Cambodian stone sculpture “Krishna Lifting Mountain Govardhan.” 

“Revealing Krishna: Journey to Cambodia’s Sacred Mountain,” which can be viewed from April 30 to  Sept. 18, 2022, presents the story and context behind the restoration undertaken by the Cleveland Museum of Art conservation specialists. 

The sculpture, which depicts the Hindu god Krishna lifting Mount Govardhan to shield his people from destruction, is one of eight deity figures recovered from cave temples in the mountain of Phnom Da near Angkor Borei, Cambodia.

Apart from the newly-restored Krishna’s unveiling, the exhibit is also integrating an interactive design that employs art, virtual tours and immersive video installations to tell the sculpture’s story. 

The exhibition also includes the showing of an original short film called “Satook” by renowned Cambodian American filmmaker PraCh Ly. 

The film looks into the significance of ancient sacred sites in the contemporary Cambodian American religious scenes and how religious traditions are transformed in diaspora communities.

The entire immersive experience is part of NMAA’s initiative called The Arts of Devotion, which aims to advance civic discussion and understanding of religion. 

Organized by the Cleveland Museum of Art and the National Museum of Asian Art, the project was made possible via an agreement with the Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts of the Government of the Kingdom of Cambodia, and in collaboration with the National Museum of Cambodia.

 

Featured Image via Cleveland Museum of Art

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