Beautiful Women and Champagne Baths: The Life of a Fashion Mogul’s Grandson

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It’s hard trying to throw shade at rich kids. No matter what you may say about them, they were born blessed with access to riches that most people can only dream of.

Meet Rich Kid of Instagram Andrew Warren, the grandson of a fashion tycoon and son of a successful N.Y. real estate investor. He acknowledges his privileged background and feels that it’s not fair he gets so much flack for his extravagant photos on Instagram.

Warren told the Daily Mail:

“I don’t think I should be judged for posting a photo like eating caviar at Claridge’s in London while it’s okay for someone to post a picture at McDonald’s.

“… My favourite Instagram caption would be ‘Lemonade, Lemonade’ or using the lemon emoji. It’s when other people are jealous or ‘look sour’ about something we do, it’s like Lemonade because they are being sour … It’s basically to the people hating because now I just laugh at it … I feel like a lot of Instagram accounts which have rich kids or whatever are trying to seek attention because they don’t get enough at home or from people in real life.”

On his Instagram, Warren can be seen hanging out with several attractive women. He points out, however, that he’s not like others. He told the Daily Mail:

“… when I post photos of my girlfriends it’s not like most guys who post unclassy hookers.”

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We recently had the pleasure of talking with Andrew Warren about his upbringing, his Instagram fame, and following in his grandfather’s footsteps to launch a new clothing line.

When you were growing up, when did you first realize that you had more than the average person?

Growing up in the New York City private school scene, I was surrounded by many fortunate kids. There are always going to be some people who have less than you, and some who have more, and that’s just life. I don’t think that where you stand amongst others should ever negatively affect you, though. I think it wasn’t until I got older and social media became so prominent that I really ever noticed how fortunate I was. I can’t change what I was born with, but I can definitely change the way in which people view me.

What do you think of all the attention your Instagram account gets you?

At one point while I was growing up, I actually wanted to be a photographer. When I realized photography was more of a fun pastime for me than a potential career path, I turned it into a big hobby of mine. I was always the one of my friends taking all of the photos, even before Instagram. I just liked to have photos because I like documenting memories, which is more important than having any material object that you can just buy. That’s why I primarily use Instagram to document what I do every day, or with my friends, and if that’s grabbing people’s attention then that doesn’t bother me. But I’m definitely not intentionally seeking anyone’s attention or approval.

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What do your parents think about your fame on the internet?

I’m really lucky to have two normal parents who have done everything for me and given me nothing but love and an amazing childhood. I think they know that in reality, I am a really good-hearted person and that that’s why so many people like me and why I have so many friends. Judging someone through only social media is just unfair and a person can’t say they know anything about my personality until they’ve actually met me in person. It’s not as though I’m in charge of Rich Kids of Instagram or have any control about anything negative about me that winds up on the internet. I am not going to stop posting photos just because other people decide to take them and turn them into something negative.

Having only known luxury most of your life, have you discovered any negatives to having such a big-money lifestyle?

I think in a lot of cases, absolutely. A lot of people get greedy and want more than they have, or get consumed by materialism, and families can get broken up because of that kind of thing. I am really fortunate that I was born to such an amazing family in general. Anyone who knows my parents knows how happy they are, in life and in their marriage, and how supportive and loving we are as a family. So much of the time you see women just staying with men for their money or for whatever else they can offer them, but that’s definitely not the case in my family. For that I am extremely lucky. My parents were always there for me and I got to do everything I wanted, whether it was traveling the world and experiencing different cultures or just traveling next door to Six Flags and eating junk food. My parents were there for me during everything I decided to try in life, from the swim team, to tennis, and now fashion. I experienced a lot of “normal” events that other kids go through, contrary to what a lot of people would assume. For example, I went to sleep-away camp for most of my childhood. I also know that I have to be a good student and graduate from college with decent grades, which is why I’m always traveling back and forth between the city and school.

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You’ve said that you’re not like the other “Rich Kids of Instagram” because some of them use social media solely to brag. In your opinion, at what point does it become bragging and not just documenting good times? Is Dan Bilzerian’s Instagram too much?

To start off, I don’t even follow Dan Bilzerian, nor do I care what he’s doing. I just looked at his Instagram and it just looks to me like he’s paying a bunch of prostitutes to hangout with him. He’s entitled to do his thing, but he’s a brand — it has nothing to do with documenting good times. I am just posting photos of my friends and me. There is no comparison whatsoever. I surprisingly don’t pay attention to stuff like that, and I don’t even watch reality television because I’m more focused on myself and my friends than what others are doing. A lot of the Instagram accounts that are known for being obnoxious have stuff like flat-out pictures of stacks of money, or anything else that is literally just asking for attention. I am just posting photos of what I am doing on a day to day basis, and people can take that for what it is, but I’m not in any way trying to brag. I also joke around so much and am known for my sense of humor, so a lot of the time everyone who actually knows me is laughing at my posts while other people take them more literally. But I’m not asking anyone who doesn’t really know me to follow me, and I don’t really care what anyone who isn’t my friend thinks. It’s their choice to look at what I’m doing — it’s not like they’re forced to be on my social media.

Having a grandfather and father who are successful entrepreneurs, what are some major lessons you’ve learned from them that you can share with us?

I think it’s just important to love yourself and to believe in yourself, even if no one else sees what you see. You don’t become successful by letting someone else do something for you. You become successful by working hard for what you believe in.

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Where did you get the idea to launch a clothing line? Tell us about the brand and why it’s unique.

There’s a boutique called Blue & Cream in the Hamptons and downtown in New York City. I shop there a lot and the people who run it asked me and a girl to start a clothing line together. Our friendship ended during the process, which is how I learned my lesson not to mix business with friendship. That’s why the line has taken so long to get going. But now I’m doing it on my own and I am really excited about it. I think it’s really for this current generation and something new that I can’t wait to show people.

If your businesses are successful, does it ever bother you that some critics are going to say you made it because you had a “leg up”? How do you deal with that type of criticism?

I think with fame in general, probably only half of the people we know of “started from the bottom,” while the other half had some connection (someone they know or are related to) through which they got the acting part or singing gig. It’s how the world works. So people can judge, but it doesn’t mean anyone is less or more talented because of how they got there. It’s about proving to the world you deserve to be there.

Tell us about the last time you felt rejected or experienced failure.

Two things that were really hard for me growing up were being dyslexic and eventually, for a few years, being heavy. I went to a special school for my dyslexia until I was in eight grade and overcame it after a lot of hard work. As for my weight, it wasn’t until my freshman year of college that my friend told me I was a little heavy. No one had ever really noticed that I was, and I wasn’t bullied or anything, so I never really cared, I guess. Since then, I have lost 85 pounds and I still work out every day and keep a healthy diet. I just feel so much better about myself when living a healthy lifestyle. The best part about losing the weight and being happy with how I look is that I worked so hard for it, and it feels good that I did it on my own. So yeah, bad things happen but the best part is overcoming them.

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What’s something you’d like to do, but haven’t had a chance to do yet?

Every year since I was 14 I have done a charity event for a charity called the Gabrielle’s Angel Foundation for cancer research. I have raised a lot of money for the cause and it feels really good helping. If my clothing line takes off like I hope, I would like to donate proceeds to a charity that I care a lot about. Although I don’t have a specific one in mind, I really want to use my publicity to make a difference in the world.

Lastly, do you have any words of wisdom or advice you live by?

I think just knowing that everything happens for a reason and that any learning experience is something important to hold on to. Someone recently told me, “Don’t strive to be well known, strive to be worth knowing.” I think that’s very true because if you just be yourself and are happy with yourself, good things will come. If you try too hard to be something you’re not, then it usually doesn’t work out so well.

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Follow Andrew on Instagram.

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