Aung San Suu Kyi moved from house arrest to solitary confinement in prison

  • Nobel laureate and former Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi, 77, has been transferred from house arrest to solitary confinement in a Nay Pyi Taw prison.
  • The deposed civilian leader was first arrested when a military coup led by Commander-in-Chief Senior General Min Aung Hlaing overthrew the government on February 1, 2021, claiming a rigged election.
  • Suu Kyi has been charged with at least 20 criminal offenses, totaling 11 years of jail time. It is unclear how long she will remain in solitary confinement.
  • As the daughter of assassinated independence leader General Aung San and a global icon of democracy, Suu Kyi remains popular in both her country and others around the world.
  • Human rights groups continue to monitor the situation in Myanmar as it falls once again into the hands of authoritarianism with the deposition of their elected officials.

Nobel laureate and former Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi, 77, has been transferred from house arrest to solitary confinement in a Nay Pyi Taw prison.

A BBC Burmese source reported that the leader was moved from house arrest to a prison in the capital of Nay Pyi Taw (also spelled Naypyidaw) on Wednesday. 

While she has been assigned three female prison staff, she has been forced to part with several close companions who had been permitted to remain with her until now.

The deposed civilian leader was first arrested when a military coup led by Commander-in-Chief Senior General Min Aung Hlaing overthrew the government on February 1, 2021, claiming a rigged election. 

Suu Kyi was taken along with other elected senior officials of the ruling National League for Democracy (NLD) party and detained in an undisclosed location.

Suu Kyi has been charged with at least 20 criminal offenses, totaling 11 years of jail time, since the military came into power last year. It is unclear how long she will remain in solitary confinement.

Some of her alleged crimes include multiple counts of corruption, such as accepting cash payments from politicians, all of which Suu Kyi has denied. 

As the daughter of assassinated independence leader General Aung San and a global icon of democracy with her Nobel Peace Prize win in 1991, Suu Kyi remains popular in both her country and around the world. 

Human rights groups and journalists continue to monitor the situation in Myanmar as the nation once again falls into the hands of an authoritarian government with the deposition of their elected officials. 

 

Featured Image via World Economic Forum; Al Jazeera English

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