Interracial Family Receives Racist Letter Telling Them to Move Out of Mostly White Neighborhood

An Asian interracial family in the predominantly White city of Vacaville, California received a disturbing letter from an anonymous sender asking them to move out of their neighborhood as the family are “not welcome here.”

Marc Yu, who is of Chinese and Filipino descent, found the letter in their mailbox as he was heading to work on Wednesday morning.

 

“The community is making this request that you find another place to live,” the letter, which assumed that the family were renters, demanded. “Renters like yourselves cannot possibly afford a home in our area.”

“We may sound harsh, but your interracial family is not welcome here.”

Marc Yu and his family. Image via Facebook / Marc Yu

Marc and his wife, Sandy, who is Mexican American, bought their home in the Meadowlands neighborhood to live in with their five children last November.

According to the letter, “neighbors” want the family to move out after they had “destroyed” the front lawn, which supposedly disturbed the “higher standards” the entire neighborhood has maintained for over 20 years.

Image: Screenshot via KCRA

“We have a lot of stuff. We have a lot of kids. So a lot of our stuff was in the driveway at one point,” Marc told NBC Bay Area.

After an anonymous complaint that led to a notice from the city, Marc finally cleaned their yard. But little did the family expect that another anonymous message would arrive, and this time, one filled with racial prejudice.

“We maintain higher standards that allow us to maintain the value of our homes which as renters you will never understand,” the letter said. “Fixing the front lawn of the home halfway will upset your landlords after you destroyed it and try to clean up your mess.”

“This is not the ghetto.”

The letter went on to threaten the family about contacting their “landlord” to have them evicted if they do not leave in peace within the next 60 days.

“My wife cried,” Marc told KRON 4. “She was really devastated by it. She almost literally said ‘we need to sell our house.’ And I said ‘why.’”

The letter concluded saying that its author will remain anonymous for protection, but that “the clock is ticking” for the family.

“We own our house. We just bought our house in November and we’re not going anywhere,” Sandy said. “So we’re here to stay.”

Image via KRON 4

Police learned about the letter after Marc shared it on Facebook. Unfortunately, they determined that no crime had been committed.

“It’s very disturbing, very troubling,” police Lt. Mark Donaldson said, according to KCRA. “I think it’s always best to err on the side of caution, allow us to look into the matter to find out the history. At this point, we don’t know if there’s any crimes. So, these things we are going to look into.”

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