Answer This 20-Question Survey to See Just How Addicted You Might be to Your Cell Phone

cellphone

Cell phone addiction is a very real phenomenon. Research has shown some people experience serious negative physiological effects when separated from their phones. There’s even a scientific term for that separation anxiety: nomophobia. (You just can’t make this stuff up … unless you’re a scientist, apparently.)

Of course, while few people will admit to being addicted to their phones, denial is often a hallmark symptom of addiction. (Gotcha!)

In an attempt to get a start on diagnosing the problem — nomophobia isn’t recognized in the current DSM V — social psychologists from the University of Iowa have devised a 20-item questionnaire, shared recently by Science of Us, designed to measure a person’s self-reported nomophobia.

Try out the questionnaire below to see how you might answer.

  1. I would feel uncomfortable without constant access to information through my smartphone.
  2. I would be annoyed if I could not look information up on my smartphone when I wanted to do so.
  3. Being unable to get the news (e.g., happenings, weather, etc.) on my smartphone would make me nervous.
  4. I would be annoyed if I could not use my smartphone and/or its capabilities when I wanted to do so.
  5. Running out of battery in my smartphone would scare me.
  6. If I were to run out of credits or hit my monthly data limit, I would panic.
  7. If I did not have a data signal or could not connect to Wi-Fi, then I would constantly check to see if I had a signal or could find a Wi-Fi network.
  8. If I could not use my smartphone, I would be afraid of getting stranded somewhere.
  9. If I could not check my smartphone for a while, I would feel a desire to check it.

If I did not have my smartphone with me …

  1. I would feel anxious because I could not instantly communicate with my family and/or friends.
  2. I would be worried because my family and/or friends could not reach me.
  3. I would feel nervous because I would not be able to receive text messages and calls.
  4. I would be anxious because I could not keep in touch with my family and/or friends.
  5. I would be nervous because I could not know if someone had tried to get a hold of me.
  6. I would feel anxious because my constant connection to my family and friends would be broken.
  7. I would be nervous because I would be disconnected from my online identity.
  8. I would be uncomfortable because I could not stay up-to-date with social media and online networks.
  9. I would feel awkward because I could not check my notifications for updates from my connections and online networks.
  10. I would feel anxious because I could not check my email messages.
  11. I would feel weird because I would not know what to do.

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