11 Times Congressman Ted Lieu Beat Donald Trump at His Own Twitter Game

Whether he’s bashing political rivals, the media, other heads of state or random celebrities, President Donald Trump uses Twitter to vent his anger, to the utter annoyance of many.

Quite fittingly, an Asian American congressman has been taking the POTUS to task via the microblogging site over the past few months.

When it comes to dishing it out to Trump in 140 characters or less, no one else comes close to Democratic Congressman Ted Lieu, who uses the platform to criticize Trump and his administration. 

The 48-year-old representative of California’s 33rd congressional district actually owns two Twitter accounts: one, which is run by his staff (standard and clean) and a personal account, where he typically goes all out in his no-nonsense delivery of Trump-trumping tweets.

His masterful use of Twitter has catapulted him into popularity, earning him the distinction of being the president’s most adept social media rival. He has also amassed a respectable number of followers on the site.

Here are some of the most memorable tweets Congressman Lieu has posted so far:

1. Calling the president out on his broken promises.

2. Reminding him of Congress’ constitutional mandate:

3. Giving him notes on allies:

4. On Trump’s first overseas visit:

5-6. On the POTUS’ apparent support for white supremacists

7-8. On Trump’s rants against media

9. On the president spouting out fake facts.

10. Commenting on Trump’s foreign policy or lack of it.

11. And straight up accusing Donald Trump of treason.

With over 350,000 Twitter followers, Lieu’s account has become the fourth most followed on Twitter among the members of the House of Representatives, just under Adam Schiff, Maxine Waters and Nancy Pelosi.

In an interview with Mashable, Lieu explained that he wants people to get involved, which means doing more than just tweeting.

“It can range from doing something as simple as writing a letter to the editor on an issue they’re upset with. Attending marches and rallies. Giving money. Registering people to vote. Working on a campaign. It’s up to folks, but everyone should try and get involved in something,” he was quoted as saying. “It’s time in America when we have an all hands on deck moment. It’s all so critical.”

Feature Image (Left) Via Flickr / Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

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