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turning red review

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Entertainment review YouTuber criticizes ‘Turning Red’ for not recognizing 9/11’s cultural impact

Turning Red review
  • YouTuber TheMysteriousMrEnter, also known as Mr. Enter, became the subject of online jokes and memes for his April 14 video review of Pixar's “Turning Red,” in which he criticizes the animated film for not recognizing the cultural impact of the 9/11 attacks.
  • Twitter user @CocoaFox023 shared a clip of the review to Twitter the day after the YouTube video was posted. The clip has garnered over 8.4 million views on the microblogging platform.
  • “This film takes place less than a year after the September 11 terrorist attacks. I bring this up because it radically altered the culture of the time in ways that make this movie feel exceptionally ignorant of the time,” Mr. Enter said in his video review.
  • His remarks prompted Twitter users to generate a wave of memes.

A YouTuber became the subject of online jokes and memes due to his review of Pixar’s “Turning Red,” in which he criticizes the animated film for not recognizing the cultural impact of the 9/11 attacks.

YouTuber TheMysteriousMrEnter, also known as Mr. Enter, uploaded his review titled “Turning Red is a mixed bag” on April 14. The video has over 77,000 views at the time of this writing.

New York pastor warns parents that Pixar’s ‘Turning Red’ is ‘demonic’ in film review

Founder and lead pastor of V1 Church in New York City Mike Signorelli warned parents of “demonic” content in Disney Pixar’s “Turning Red” in his “Christian review” posted online.

Signorelli’s review of Disney Pixar’s latest animated film, which was uploaded to his YouTube channel and has since been taken down, used his theological perspective to assess the coming-of-age story of a teen who discovers her ability to transform into a giant red panda in the midst of puberty.  

Review of ‘Turning Red’ that criticized the movie’s characters as unrelatable prompts backlash, apologies

turning red review
  • CinemaBlend’s Managing Director Sean O’Connell was heavily criticized online for his review of Disney Pixar’s “Turning Red,” which he deemed an “exhausting” film not “made for a universal audience.”
  • His review circulated on Twitter, leading many users to accuse him of dismissing the movie because it featured Asian protagonists, whom he criticized as unrelatable.
  • “This is what happens when white males are presented as the default. Audiences have empathized with white male protagonists forever but you get one Asian girl in animation and these people question their existence,” POC Culture tweeted in response.
  • The online backlash prompted a Twitter apology from both O'Connell and CinemaBlend’s Editor-in-Chief Mack Rawden.

A review of Disney Pixar’s “Turning Red” published by CinemaBlend was taken down after it was heavily criticized online.

CinemaBlend Managing Director Sean O’Connell deemed Pixar’s latest animated feature “exhausting” and not “made for a universal audience.” His review, in which he gave the film two-and-a-half stars, has since been unpublished from the publication’s website, although it can be found archived online.  

‘Turning Red’ criticized by some parents for embracing female puberty and menstruation

turning red period
  • Pixar’s “Turning Red” has drawn negative criticism from parents who are uncomfortable with exposing children to what they deem “adult topics” for scenes in which the characters discuss female puberty and menstruation.
  • Chinese Canadian director Domee Shi and Chinese American production designer Rona Liu, on the other hand, say they set out to depict an honest story that aims to help young women feel heard and seen.
  • The PG-rated film has also garnered praise for destigmatizing and normalizing menstruation.

Pixar’s latest animated feature “Turning Red” has drawn negative criticism from parents for including scenes in which characters discuss female puberty and menstruation.

Directed by Chinese Canadian filmmaker Domee Shi, the film follows the story of Meilin “Mei” Lee, a 13-year-old Chinese Canadian girl from Toronto who discovers that she has inherited the ability to transform into a giant red panda when emotionally provoked. The PG-rated coming-of-age story is an allegory for puberty that many have also praised for normalizing the taboo topic of menstruation.

‘Turning Red’: 19 surprising Easter eggs you might have missed while watching Pixar’s new movie

Pixar’s latest animated feature “Turning Red” features several Easter eggs while also paying homage to Toronto, where Chinese Canadian filmmaker Domee Shi grew up.

“Turning Red” follows the story of Meilin “Mei” Lee, a 13-year-old Chinese Canadian girl from Toronto who turns into a giant red panda whenever she gets too excited or stressed.

Angry Reviewer Gets Shut Down By Cafe Owner After Complaining Over $2.88 Bill

A U.K. cafe owner is being applauded after responding to one TripAdvisor reviewer who was on a “tight budget” and left a not-so-nice review after she was charged £2, about $2.88, for a slice of lemon and some hot water.

The woman, known as Hannah C., went out for tea with some friends at Bennett’s Cafe & Bistro in York. As Hannah was on a tight budget, she ordered a hot water and a lemon while her friends ordered tea and cake. When the check came, she was shocked to see she was charged at all and complained to the staff, who she alleges became rude over the matter.

Portland man accused of punching 5-year-old girl and her father now held without bail

  • Dylan J. Kesterson, who is accused of attacking a Japanese family in Portland, Oregon, is now being held without bail.
  • Kesterson, 34, was first arrested shortly after the incident on Saturday, in which he allegedly punched a 36-year-old father and his 5-year-old daughter because he thought they were Japanese.
  • Kesterson, who had no prior convictions, was released later that day.
  • Police re-arrested him on Wednesday after he failed to show up to his arraignment hearing.
  • Mayor Ted Wheeler criticized the city’s criminal justice system, saying it “needs to be reviewed from top to bottom to ensure that individuals like this [Kesterson] are not released prematurely.”

A man from Portland, Oregon, facing a slew of charges after allegedly punching a 36-year-old Japanese man and his 5-year-old daughter is now being held without bail.

Dylan J. Kesterson, 34, was first arrested shortly after the incident on Saturday afternoon, which occurred along Portland’s Eastbank Esplanade and was reportedly witnessed by several bystanders.

John Cho on coming-of-age as an Asian American, ‘Cowboy Bebop’ and racism in Hollywood

john cho book
  • Actor John Cho spoke to NextShark about his new young adult book, “Troublemaker,” an Asian American coming-of-age novel set during the 1992 Los Angeles Riots.
  • Told from the perspective of Korean American middle schooler Jordan, the novel highlights the experiences of his grandfather, parents and sister, highlighting generational differences.
  • Cho spoke about his career in Hollywood, the cancellation of “Cowboy Bebop” and his own journey of understanding his Korean American and Asian American identities.

In “Troublemaker,” actor-turned-author John Cho confronts the difficulties of coming of age as an Asian American in an era that parallels today’s issues. 

The cover of John Cho’s first book “Troublemaker” features the book’s protagonist Jordan, a young Asian American teenager, dressed simply in a white T-shirt and jeans and standing resolutely in the center of the street, his hands in fists, staring straight ahead at a point beyond the reader.

Emerson College targeted by ad campaign for suspending student group behind ‘China Kinda Sus’ stickers

Emerson College
  • The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), a nonprofit civil liberties group, has launched an ad campaign targeting Emerson College for suspending the school’s Turning Point USA (TPUSA) chapter in late 2021.
  • TPUSA caused controversy in October last year for allegedly criticizing the Chinese government by handing out stickers that read “China kinda sus.”
  • For its ad campaign, FIRE has created a mobile billboard, posters on the city’s transit system and a website called “Emerson kinda sus,” among others.

A nonprofit civil liberties group that promotes freedom of speech in schools recently released an ad campaign targeting Emerson College for suspending the conservative student group who handed out controversial “China kinda sus” stickers late last year.

The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education’s (FIRE) ad campaign was created to support Emerson College’s Turning Point USA (TPUSA) chapter, which said it sought to criticize the Chinese government and its alleged human rights abuses through its stickers, according to National Review.

Simu Liu touts Weibo messages from Chinese fans praising ‘Shang-Chi,’ expressing regret over China ban

shang-chi

Simu Liu took to Instagram yesterday to share positive comments he has received from Chinese “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings” fans in a show of common ground being found above government and political rhetoric.

What they’re saying: The glowing reviews, which he reportedly received on Weibo, praised his performance in the Marvel blockbuster and expressed regret over its lack of Chinese release.