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Jumbo Floating Restaurant

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Hong Kong’s iconic Jumbo Floating Restaurant is now upside down and trapped on a reef

  • Hong Kong’s Jumbo Floating Restaurant, which closed its doors in 2020 but made headlines when it began to sink earlier this year, is now allegedly trapped upside down on a reef.
  • A Hainan Maritime Safety Administration duty officer said on Wednesday that the iconic boat was still near the Paracel Islands, also known as the Xisha Islands, in China.
  • “We cannot say for sure how much longer the investigation will take. It is being conducted in accordance with the relevant laws,” he reported.
  • The duty officer also noted, “Presently there is no threat to the safety of navigation in the area,” while declining to discuss the state of the Jumbo.
  • The Jumbo Floating Restaurant first capsized in June due to rough seas while en route to Cambodia after closing its doors in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Hong Kong’s Jumbo Floating Restaurant, which closed its doors in 2020 but made headlines when it began to sink earlier this year, is now allegedly trapped upside down on a reef.

A Hainan Maritime Safety Administration duty officer said on Wednesday that the iconic boat was still near the Paracel Islands, also known as the Xisha Islands in China. 

Fate of Hong Kong’s Jumbo Floating Restaurant takes mysterious turn as owners insist it didn’t ‘sink’

  • Owners of Hong Kong’s Jumbo Floating Restaurant have denied claims that the iconic craft sank in the South China Sea.
  • The restaurant owner initially released a statement on Monday that seemed to suggest that the craft had sank, stating that the towing of the restaurant encountered “adverse conditions” while being taken through the South China Sea.
  • On Friday, a spokesperson for the company emphasized to CNN how it had always used the term “capsize,” and not “sink,” to describe the incident, although they declined to clarify whether this meant the boat remained afloat.
  • A company PR representative said on Friday in a separate announcement that the boat was still afloat, although rescue work would be “extremely difficult” due to the depth of the water.

Owners of Hong Kong’s Jumbo Floating Restaurant have denied claims that the iconic craft sank in the South China Sea.

The establishment originally closed its doors in early 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with its owners reporting losses totaling more than 100 million Hong Kong dollars (approximately $12.75 million).

Hong Kong’s iconic Jumbo Floating Restaurant sinks while at sea

  • Jumbo Floating Restaurant, Hong Kong’s iconic landmark, capsized in the South China Sea on Sunday, days after it was towed from Aberdeen Harbor.
  • “As the water depth at the scene is over 1,000 meters, (it makes it) extremely difficult to carry out salvage works,” Aberdeen Restaurant Enterprise, the parent company of Jumbo Kingdom, said in a statement, adding it is “very saddened by this accident. The company is now getting further details of the accident from the towing company."
  • Before being towed, Aberdeen Restaurant Enterprises said it hired professional marine engineers to give the restaurant a thorough inspection and install hoardings before its departure. The ship also received appropriate approvals before leaving the harbor last week.
  • Locals bid farewell on June 14 as the popular tourist attraction gets towed away from Aberdeen Harbor.

Hong Kong’s iconic landmark Jumbo Floating Restaurant has capsized in the South China Sea, days after Hong Kongers bid farewell to the popular tourist attraction.

Aberdeen Restaurant Enterprises, the parent company of Jumbo Kingdom, announced on Monday that the three-story-high restaurant faced “adverse conditions” on Saturday as it was passing the Xisha Islands, also known as the Paracel Islands.

Watch: Hong Kong residents bid farewell to Jumbo Floating Restaurant as it is towed to secret location

  • The Jumbo Floating Restaurant offered Chinese banquet-style fine dining and was known for their Cantonese cuisine and seafood dishes. The venue boasted more than 45,000 square feet over three floors and had the capacity to accommodate 2,300 diners.
  • During the start of the pandemic in 2020, the tourist attraction was shut down and all of its staff dismissed. Shareholders spent millions of Hong Kong dollars just for inspection and maintenance despite the restaurant never opening its doors due to COVID-19 regulations.
  • Aberdeen Restaurant Enterprises did not reveal Jumbo Floating Restaurant’s new destination.

Admirers watched helplessly as the iconic Jumbo Floating Restaurant was towed away from Aberdeen Harbor in Hong Kong on June 14. 

Founded in October 1976, Jumbo Floating Restaurant became the second floating restaurant in the Jungle Kingdom after Tai Pak Floating Restaurant was opened in 1952, burned down in 1971 and remodeled in 1987. The late Macau casino tycoon Stanley Ho Hung-sun invested millions to create Jumbo Floating Restaurant and its artwork, dragons and colorful pagoda heavily inspired by Imperial China. Both restaurants were renovated in 2003. 

Iconic Hong Kong landmark Jumbo Floating Restaurant is sinking — and no one may save it

  • Hong Kongers are seeking help for the iconic landmark Jumbo Floating Restaurant days after its kitchen barge sank on May 31.
  • Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor declared in a statement released in late May that the local government has no intention to invest in the tourist attraction.
  • Opened by the late Macau casino tycoon Stanley Ho Hung-sun in 1976, the three-story-high restaurant spanning 76 meters (249 feet) has reportedly served over 30 billion customers since its opening day, including royals such as Queen Elizabeth, Hollywood stars Gwyneth Paltrow and Tom Cruise and Hong Kong actor Chow Yun-fat.
  • In early 2020, the establishment closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Its owner has reported losses totaling more than 100 million Hong Kong dollars (approximately $12.75 million).

Hong Kongers are seeking help for the iconic landmark Jumbo Floating Restaurant days after its kitchen barge sank and the local government refused to keep the establishment afloat.

In a statement released in late May, Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor declared that the government has no intention to invest in the tourist attraction, which has proven costly to repair and maintain.