Japanese Startup’s New Video Showing AI Models is Terrifying and Impressive at the Same Time

A new video showcasing dozens of “fashion models” continuously morphing into people of another sex and color with new sets of clothes is the latest evidence of how far artificial intelligence has come in understanding humans.

Aside from physical appearances, this particular AI came up with its own poses and stances, presenting the models as if they’ve come from a live fashion catalog straight from the future.

 

The new deep-learning algorithm comes from DataGrid, a tech startup housed in Japan’s Kyoto University.

The technology, referred to as Generative Adversarial Network (GAN), is the kind of AI used to copy something that exists in the natural world.

GAN involves one artificial neural network that continuously “fools” another until the latter fails to distinguish, in this case, real human images from computer-generated ones.

In the video, it allowed for the production of high-resolution (1024×1024) whole-body models.

While the video only runs for 44 seconds, countless looks and clothing combinations can be seen — with none of them actually being real.

In a press release, DataGrid announced that it will run demonstrations with advertising and apparel companies, which happen to be their primary target markets for the new technology.

“We will further improve the accuracy of the whole-body model automatic generation AI and research and develop the motion generation AI,” DataGrid said. “In addition, we will conduct demonstration experiments with advertising and apparel companies to develop functions required for actual operation.”

With these AI-generated models, such companies no longer have to spend so much on human models and studio services, possibly eliminating various jobs in the modeling industry.

YouTube users commented on DataGrid’s video:

“Excellent work!”

“So long, modelling career.”

“This kind of technology is going to destroy a LOT of careers.”

“Shallow modeling industry just received a death blow. The world of internet avatars will change and turn hordes of web users into desirables.”

“I love technology and [I’m] not against it, but I fear this will be used for mass alienation. For example, in my country, during the last election, parties were found to use bots to give arguments in social media for their propaganda. Imagine if those bots looked like a real person.”

Images via DataGrid

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