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Update: Alleged Nanjing Massacre photos discovered in Minnesota pawn shop debunked

  • Photos in an album discovered by a Minnesota pawn shop owner previously believed to have been taken during the 1937 Nanjing Massacre have been debunked.
  • Evan Kail, the owner of St. Louis Park Gold & Silver who goes by “Pawn Man” online, posted a video of the album to TikTok that went viral overnight, garnering over 30 million views and attracting international attention for what many believed was a major historical revelation.
  • “Because of these trolls, particularly this one assclown, nobody will go near this thing now,” Kail claims in a video update posted to his YouTube channel. “I can’t get anybody to f*cking check it out. Every person in Minnesota I had lined up who had some kind of credential ghosted me. They want nothing to do with this because of the controversy.” They don’t want their name anywhere near it.”
  • In an interview with The New Yorker, Timothy Brook, a professor specializing in Chinese history during the Japanese occupation, inspected photographs provided by Kail and determined that “as far as I can tell, none of these photographs are from Nanjing.”
  • It was revealed that the photos Kail believed originated from Nanjing — previously known as Nanking — were captioned “Nanking Road” in the album, which Kail had mistaken for the city when it actually refers to a street in Shanghai.

Photos discovered by a Minnesota pawn shop owner previously believed to have been taken during the 1937 Nanjing Massacre have been debunked.

Evan Kail, the owner of St. Louis Park Gold & Silver who goes by “Pawn Man” online, posted a video to TikTok on Aug. 31 claiming to have discovered long-lost photographs taken during the massacre which lasted for six weeks and saw at least 200,000 Chinese civilians killed by the Imperial Japanese Army. Kail’s video went viral overnight, garnering over 30 million views and attracting international attention for what many believed was a major historical revelation.

San Diego officially apologizes for supporting Japanese American incarceration during WWII

Japanese American concentration camps
  • The San Diego City Council officially apologized to the Japanese American community and passed a resolution that rescinded Resolution 76068 on Tuesday.
  • “The Council of the City of San Diego apologizes to all people of Japanese ancestry for its past actions in support of the unjust exclusion, removal, and incarceration of Japanese Americas [sic] and residents of Japanese ancestry during World War II, and for its failure to support and defend the civil rights and civil liberties of these individuals during this period,” the apology read.
  • Resolution 76068, which ordered the FBI to forcibly remove residents of Japanese descent from the county and transfer them to the 10 concentration camps in the western part of the U.S., came into effect after then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order No. 9066 (E.O. 9066) on Feb. 19, 1942.
  • More than 120,000 Japanese Americans were forcibly removed from their homes and transferred to the concentration camps in the western U.S. and Arkansas weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor during World War II. Among those were 1,900 San Diego residents of Japanese descent.
  • “It is incredibly important that we identify the racist acts of the past and injustices of the past and address them head-on,” Council President Sean Elo-Rivera said. “We can acknowledge the wrong that the city committed.”

San Diego officially apologized and announced the revocation of a 1942 resolution that supported the incarceration of many Japanese Americans during World War II.

Council members on Tuesday acknowledged the city’s racist past when it imprisoned more than 1,900 San Diego County residents of Japanese descent in the concentration camps in the western United States and Arkansas during WWII.

Ancient China used face-whitening cosmetics before Ancient Greece, study claims

  • A team of researchers from the University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Shaanxi Academy of Archaeology discovered ancient bronze containers containing lead white residue that the ancient Chinese used for face-whitening makeup.
  • The discovery was made at a nobility cemetery located in the Liangdaicun site in the city of Hancheng in China’s Shaanxi province.
  • The researchers published their study in the open-access journal Humanities and Social Sciences Communications on Sept. 3.
  • “The results show that these residues were the earliest synthesized lead white in the world to date, which was produced by the precipitation method in solution distinct from the corrosion method practiced in ancient Greece,” the researchers wrote.

Chinese researchers have unearthed bronze containers with lead white residue that the ancient Chinese used for face-whitening makeup around 300 years before the ancient Greeks started making their own.

The team of researchers from the University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS) and the Shaanxi Academy of Archaeology discovered the ancient artifacts at the Liangdaicun site in the city of  Hancheng in China’s Shaanxi Province.

National Lao-Hmong Memorial Foundation restores warplane to honor Hmong Vietnam War veterans

air show
  • The National Lao-Hmong Memorial Foundation held an air show showcasing a restored T-28 airplane at Fleming Field in South Saint Paul, Minnesota, on Saturday.
  • The design of a memorial, which will be built in a suburb of Denver, was also unveiled at the event.
  • The event was held to honor Hmong soldiers who fought alongside the U.S. during the Vietnam War.
  • From 1960 to 1975, the CIA recruited Hmong people to fight in a “Secret War” in Laos, during which more than 35,000 Hmong soldiers were killed.

The National Lao-Hmong Memorial Foundation restored a T-28 warplane and revealed the design of a memorial to honor Hmong soldiers who fought alongside the U.S. during the Vietnam War.

From 1960 to 1975, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) recruited Hmong people to fight in a “Secret War” in Laos. Hmong pilots were trained to fly T-28 airplanes and tasked with as many as 10 missions a day.  

School district in Wisconsin to make Hmong, AAPI history part of curriculum

Verona Schools AAPI
  • The Verona Area School District Board of Education in Wisconsin unanimously approved a resolution on Monday expressing support for the Hmong, Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community.
  • The resolution also calls for the integration of Hmong and AAPI history and culture into the district’s school curriculum.
  • English teacher Kabby Hong and VASD Asian American Student Association co-President Angela Miller attended the board meeting and spoke in support of the AAPI resolution, urging board members to approve the measure.
  • It remains to be seen if other districts in the state will follow.
  • There are currently four states — Illinois, Connecticut, New Jersey and Rhode Island — that have passed legislation to require schools to teach AAPI history.

A school board in Wisconsin is calling for the integration of the Hmong and Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community culture and history into the curriculum. 

On Monday, the Verona Area School District Board of Education unanimously approved a resolution in support of the community, becoming the first in the state to do so. 

Los Angeles calls on public for ideas for memorial to 1871 Chinese Massacre victims

  • On Aug. 19, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, along with the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs, the office of Councilmember Kevin de León and El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument, released a request for ideas for conceptual proposals to develop a memorial for the victims of the 1871 Chinese Massacre.
  • The mass killing, which has been largely forgotten, saw a mob of hundreds murder at least 18 Chinese men in a racially motivated attack in the old Chinatown neighborhood on Oct. 24, 1871.
  • The memorial will be built to raise public awareness of the massacre and acknowledge the past and current tensions over race and violence.
  • The proposals, which are due by Oct. 12, will be reviewed by arts and design experts who will select five artists to receive a $15,000 stipend to develop their concepts and present them in a public forum.

The city of Los Angeles has called on the public for ideas in developing a memorial to the victims of the 1871 Chinese Massacre. 

The mass killing, which has been largely forgotten, saw an eruption of gunfire at around 4 p.m. on Oct. 24, 1871. A mob of hundreds murdered at least 18 Chinese men in a racially motivated attack in the old Chinatown neighborhood.

Japanese American National Museum premieres cancer-battling director’s film on pains of WWII incarceration camps

NO NO GIRL
  • Written and directed by Paul Daisuke Goodman, “No No Girl” centers on a Japanese American family uncovering their forgotten history in the incarceration camps of World War II.
  • Goodman, 30, developed the film thinking about his own grandfather, who was incarcerated at the Rohwer Camp in Arkansas and later enlisted in the highly decorated 442nd Regimental Combat Team.
  • Goodman worked on the film while battling acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which he was diagnosed with in 2016.
  • The film, which stars newcomer Mika Dyo, Academy Award winner Chris Tashima and an ensemble of Japanese American talent, premiered at the Japanese American National Museum on Saturday.

A film about a Japanese American family uncovering their forgotten history in the incarceration camps of World War II premiered at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo on Saturday.

Written and directed by Paul Daisuke Goodman, “No No Girl” stars newcomer Mika Dyo and Academy Award winner Chris Tashima, along with an ensemble of Japanese American talent.

‘Why is the story still unknown?’: ‘Free Chol Soo Lee’ co-directors refuse to let America forget Korean American wrongfully convicted of murder in 1973

Julie Ha and Eugene Yi’s six-year journey to illuminate the life and legacy of Chol Soo Lee, a Korean American man falsely convicted of murder, began at the end of his story.

While Ha first learned of him through her mentor K.W. Lee, a journalist who played an instrumental role in raising awareness of the injustices that plagued the wrongly convicted man, she truly came to grips with the gravity of Chol Soo Lee’s situation at his funeral.

Thai actor Praya Lundberg to star in film about Rock Springs massacre that killed 28 Chinese miners in Wyoming

  • A film about the Rock Springs massacre, the real-life incident that resulted in the deaths of 28 Asian immigrant railroad workers in 1885, is set to star Thai Swedish actor Praya Lundberg.
  • “Ghosts of the Railroad” will be based on one of the bloodiest racially motivated massacres against Chinese immigrants in American history, with some fictionalized elements included.
  • In the film, Lundberg plays the role of Jade, a woman from the present day whose strange visions transport her to the 1800s and reveal that her family’s estate was the scene where crimes against Asian railroad workers took place.
  • According to Zanubon, Lundberg was perfectly cast for the role for being “not just an amazing talent but an amazing human being.”
  • On Sept. 2, 1885, armed white miners from the present-day city of Rock Springs in Wyoming shot at Chinese miners, looted their houses and burned 78 Chinese homes, resulting in at least 28 Chinese miners dead and 15 injured.

Thai Swedish actor Praya Lundberg is set to star in a new film about the Rock Springs massacre, the real-life incident that resulted in the deaths of 28 Asian immigrant railroad workers in 1885.

In “Ghosts of the Railroad,” Lundberg will play the role of Jade, a woman from the present day who gets transported to the 1800s via strange visions. Through these visions, she discovers that her family’s estate was the scene where crimes against Asian railroad workers took place. 

Denver removes anti-Chinese plaque 142 years after anti-Chinese riot that destroyed its Chinatown

  • Due to historical inaccuracies, Denver removed a plaque titled “Chinese Riot of 1880” from a building in Lower Downtown on Monday.
  • The plaque was, in fact, not about a “Chinese riot” but an anti-Chinese riot that resulted in damages to homes, businesses and even the death of a man named Look Young.
  • The writing also lauded white people who showed “remarkable courage” during the riot and overemphasized the city’s Chinese drug problem as a cause for hostilities.
  • The move came after the city officially apologized to early Chinese immigrants and their descendants in April for the riot and historical injustices to the community.

Denver removed a historical marker riddled with inaccuracies about the Chinese community’s presence and influence in the city in the late 1800s on Monday.

The plaque, located in the Lower Downtown (LoDo) neighborhood, inaccurately described events surrounding the so-called “Chinese Riot of 1880,” which occurred on Halloween that year and stemmed from a saloon brawl between white patrons and two Chinese customers.

Japan payment of less than $1 to Korean WWII victims for forced labor draws outrage

  • A civic group in South Korea has denounced the less- than- one- dollar pension payment from the Japanese government to victims of forced labor during its occupation of the peninsula.
  • The Japanese Forced Mobilization Civic Group called the payment “a malicious ridicule and an insult” at a press conference on Thursday.
  • A 92-year-old forced labor victim by the name of Chung Sin-young also spoke at the conference, calling Japan’s behavior “absurd.”
  • While presenting the deposit information in her passbook, Chung said, “They gave me 931 won, which cannot even cover the cost of children’s snacks. They forced children into labor without providing proper meals, and they still have not apologized.”
  • She continued, “There isn’t much time left for us grandmothers. We urge you to hurry and apologize.”

The Japanese government has doled out a pension payment to victims of forced labor during the country’s occupation of Korea, but at less than $1 per individual, the move has only prompted further outrage from those affected.  

The Japanese Forced Mobilization Civic Group denounced the pension payment on Thursday, claiming a number of victims of forced labor received only 931 won (approximately $0.74). The civic group said the payment was “a malicious ridicule and an insult” and urged the Japanese government to “apologize for the 931 won payment and disclose all unpaid wages and pension records of victims of forced labor.”

Discovery of extinct panda species reinforces evidence of pandas originating in Europe, not Asia

  • The recent discovery of an ancient panda species in Bulgaria is reinforcing previous studies that point to panda bears originating in Europe.
  • The species, known as the Agriarctos nikolovi, was identified after scientists at the Bulgarian National Museum of Natural History investigated two fossilized teeth that were first unearthed from coal deposits in the 1970s.
  • Authors of the study say the species is only a “close relative” to the modern giant panda, but it may have been an ancestor that eventually moved to Asia.
  • China, which declared the giant panda as its national animal, has been slow to accept the European origin theory after previous discoveries in Hungary.

The recent discovery of an ancient panda species in Bulgaria is reinforcing previous studies that point to panda bears originating in Europe — a notion that China, where the giant panda is a national symbol, has been slow to accept.

The species, known as Agriarctos nikolovi, was identified after scientists at the Bulgarian National Museum of Natural History investigated two fossilized teeth that were first unearthed from coal deposits near a village northwest of the country in the late 1970s.